Jump to content


Infrastructure Development Projects


23 replies to this topic

#11 status - Slipknot

status - Slipknot
  • Guests

Posted 09 June 2017 - 04:27 PM

Thought I would tie some links together with this thread....

 

:chick07:

 

33 Cities Cheated on Lead Contamination Tests
 
 
SNAPSHOTS OF PUBLIC SANITATION
 
 
 
Los Angeles' Methane Leak Continues
 
 
 
Another China Chemical Plant Explosion
 
 
Fukushima?
 
 
:Heavy:

  • 0



#12 status - Infrastructure

status - Infrastructure
  • Guests

Posted 29 December 2017 - 11:46 PM

Taken for a Ride - The U.S. History of the Assault on Public Transport in the Last Century
 
How the freeways took over public transportation and why. Anyone who lives in traffic clogged city knows the inherent frustration traversing the speed ways. Los Angeles used to have trains until they were removed in favor of the highway.
Electric transportation was the norm in the those days. Too bad electric powered public transportation hasn't developed as well as it should be. 
 
This documentary will show how the auto and oil industries pushed for more roads to sustain more cars. A sustainable market plan for years and years to come.
 
The new infrastructure plan should reflect on these issues. Community transportation should profit the general public most of all. 
 
 

  • 0

#13 Feathers

Feathers

    Premium Member

  • Moderators
  • 666 posts

Posted 30 December 2017 - 12:05 AM

:Good_One:  

 

Considering Trump is planning to tackle the infrastructure soon it would behoove us all the learn as much as possible about how it all works. Its many subsidiaries and contractors working to influence the transportation control laws, ordinances from the counties and states, and ultimately leading to the federal governments control methods....and beyond! Which mostly benefits the money men anyways. The public is always secondary when it comes to public transportation. Modern infrastructure is what America needs. Whatever Trump plans will last for decades to come. I'm wondering if he can pull off a major building project to reach the ages...

 

:Egg-icon:

 

Too optimistic?

 

:Shrug:

We'll see...

 

  :Heavy:


  • 0
Posted Image

#14 status - Jackrabbit

status - Jackrabbit
  • Guests

Posted 30 December 2017 - 12:18 AM

I love the propaganda methods used to sell the public on building a major freeway and toll road system. Using promotional films and inside influence from the military and major industries a massive propaganda squeeze was pushed forward by the Eisenhower administration. The highway trust fund was enacted using the gas tax. Half the proceeds were used to build the interstate highway system. Even the clergy was called in to sell it. Children weren't immune to the advertisements either; all of it too make the world a safer place. I've heard that before.


  • 0

#15 Feathers

Feathers

    Premium Member

  • Moderators
  • 666 posts

Posted 30 December 2017 - 12:26 AM

Still, the country needs a major overhaul in all facets of the infrastructure. Trump likes to build. I say let him build. Learning from past mistakes and the history of crooked business practices should help steer things in a positive direction. Benefiting the public more.


  • 0
Posted Image

#16 Feathers

Feathers

    Premium Member

  • Moderators
  • 666 posts

Posted 01 February 2018 - 06:16 PM

:bumpsmall:


  • 0
Posted Image

#17 status - Guest

status - Guest
  • Guests

Posted 06 February 2018 - 11:31 AM

I think it's important to consider some of the possible negative and positive aspects of what has become known as 'defensive architecture'. It's an ancient concept of building. Looking at the reasons it has been used historically may shed some light on these pros and cons. 


  • 0

#18 Ghost in the Machine

Ghost in the Machine

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 263 posts

Posted 06 February 2018 - 01:45 PM

Mankind can build great things. History shows this. Which constructions serve a society best. Which ones deserve to be maintained for all future generations to live and grow with? What can todays society build that can last for 2000 years? 


  • 0

7mDFXjl.gif


#19 Ghost in the Machine

Ghost in the Machine

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 263 posts

Posted 07 February 2018 - 03:10 PM

It's Time to Invest in the United States Rail System
 
It's time to make infrastructure sexy again, and we can start by fixing the United States rail systems.
 
Believe it or not, there was a time in the US when riding a train was luxurious. There were classy dining cars, moonlit rides across the countryside and you could even get lucky in a sleeping car.
 
Those days are long gone.
 
Today, despite the fact that Amtrak ridership has increased by 50 percent in the last 15 years and continues to increase along the Northeast Corridor, train travel is anything but sexy.
 
That's because our nation's rail systems are relics of another time.
 
 
united_states_of_underinvestment.jpg
 
Why Can't the United States Build a High-Speed Rail System?
 
The problem isn't geography, demographics, or money—it's federal will.
 
Virtually every wealthy nation in the world has invested in a high-speed rail network—with the striking exception of the United States. From Japan to France, even from Turkey to Russia, trains travel through the country at speeds of 150 miles per hour or above, linking city centers and providing a desirable alternative to both air and automobile travel. Meanwhile, outside Amtrak's 28 miles of 150-m.p.h. track in rural Massachusetts and Rhode Island, the American rail network is largely limited to speeds of 110 m.p.h. or less. There are few reasons to think the situation will change much in the coming decades.
 
So why has the United States failed to fund and construct high-speed rail?
 
The problem is not political process. Most of the countries that have built high-speed rail are democratic, and have submitted the projects to citizen review; others, like Germany and Russia, have federated governments similar to ours that divide general decision-making between levels of authority. Nor is it geography. The British and French completed a 31-mile tunnel under the British Channel 20 years ago, while many American cities are located in flat regions with few physical construction obstacles. Nor is it the characteristics of our urban areas. While U.S. cities are less dense than those of many other countries, the Northeast is denser, more transit reliant, and more populated than most areas served by high-speed rail abroad. Nor still is it money. Though the United States invests less in infrastructure than other developed countries do, America nevertheless remains an immensely wealthy nation perfectly capable of spending on new rail links if desired.
 
What's missing is a federal commitment to a well-funded national rail plan. Instead, we have a political system in which the federal government, having devolved virtually all decision-making power to states, cannot prioritize one project over another in the national interest. We have a funding system that encourages study after study of unfundable or unbuildable projects in places that refuse to commit their own resources. And we have a bureaucracy that, having never operated or constructed modern intercity rail, doesn't understand what it takes. This helter-skelter approach to transportation improvements is fundamentally incapable of supporting large-expenditure, long-range projects like high-speed rail.
 
This wasn't always the case. In 1956, Congress approved a significant increase in the federal gas tax, and with it a national plan for interstate highways. That plan, which included a steady stream of funding and a clear map of national priorities, was mostly completed over the next three decades. Though implemented by states, highway alignments were chosen at the national level, with the intention of connecting the largest cities, regardless of political boundaries. Funding came almost entirely (90 percent) from the national government and was guaranteed as long as a route was on the national map. Physical requirements for roadways were mandated at the national level and universally applied. And construction was completed by state departments of transportation that were technically knowledgeable, accustomed to building such public works, and able to make decisions about how to move forward.
 
The result was a system of roadways that most Americans rely on, often daily. The interstate system is unquestionably the nation's transportation lifeblood.
 
 
1024px-High-Speed_Rail_Corridor_Designat
 

  • 0

7mDFXjl.gif


#20 Feathers

Feathers

    Premium Member

  • Moderators
  • 666 posts

Posted 07 February 2018 - 03:49 PM

Yes, the whole framework needs an upgrade. Bad railway lines, rotten gas pipes, sanitation problems, the list goes on.
 
 
 
Here's a recent timeline of train derailments involving oil and ethenol:
 
 
BLOG_Timeline.jpg

  • 0
Posted Image



Reply to this topic



  


IPB Skin By Virteq