Jump to content


Photo

One step closer to total tracking...

Psychology microchip

3 replies to this topic

#1 Ghost in the Machine

Ghost in the Machine

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 222 posts

Posted 28 January 2017 - 01:52 PM

The government will decide who is ‘mentally unfit’ and must be tracked
 
It seems too far-fetched to be true, especially in the “land of the free” where the Constitution supposedly recognizes and enshrines certain “inalienable” human rights like individual choice and privacy, but it’s true nonetheless: In the United States, we have all come one step closer to being microchipped by mandate.
 
“While this initiative may have noble intentions, ‘small and temporary’ programs in the name of safety and security often evolve into permanent and enlarged bureaucracies that infringe on the American people’s freedoms,” he said. That is exactly what we have here. A safety problem exists for people with Alzheimer’s, autism and other mental health issues, so the fix, we are told, is to have the Department of Justice start a tracking program so we can use some device or method to track these individuals 24/7.”
 

  • 0

7mDFXjl.gif


#2 status - whn

status - whn
  • Guests

Posted 24 April 2017 - 08:12 AM

computers-spam-robots-artificial_intelli


  • 0

#3 status - Falkan

status - Falkan
  • Guests

Posted 02 September 2017 - 11:27 PM

tumblr_nc2hl4ira61qcdel4o1_400.gif

 

Is that you?

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • 0

#4 Ghost in the Machine

Ghost in the Machine

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 222 posts

Posted 03 September 2017 - 05:48 PM

Each morning around 6, Mary Ellen Snodgrass swallows a computer chip. It’s embedded in one of her pills and roughly the size of a grain of sand. When it hits her stomach, it transmits a signal to her tablet computer indicating that she has successfully taken her heart and thyroid medications. 
 
As the size and cost of chip technology has fallen dramatically over the past few years, dozens of companies and academic research teams are rushing to make ingestible or implantable chips that will help patients track the condition of their bodies in real time and in a level of detail that they have never seen before.
 
Made entirely of edible ingredients, the one-square-millimeter chip has copper on one side and magnesium on the other, and it is activated when it comes into contact with stomach acids. It’s used in conjunction with a patch, which is shaped like a large Band-Aid and worn on the torso. For five minutes after being swallowed, the chip sends out a unique 16-digit code that is picked up by the patch, which in turn beams the information to a nearby smartphone or tablet — where it can be shared via the Internet with family members, doctors and the company.
 
But while the technology may be within reach, the idea of putting little machines into the human body makes some uncomfortable, and there are numerous uncharted scientific, legal and ethical questions that need to be thought through. 
 
What kind of warnings should users receive about the risks of implanting chip technology inside a body, for instance? How will patients be assured that the technology won’t be used to compel them to take medications they don’t really want to take? Could law enforcement obtain data that would reveal which individuals abuse drugs or sell them on the black market? Could what started as a voluntary experiment be turned into a compulsory government identification program that could erode civil liberties?
 

  • 0

7mDFXjl.gif




Reply to this topic



  



Similar Topics Collapse


IPB Skin By Virteq