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The Powers and Authority of Law Enforcement

chicken coup

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#1 Digger

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 12:27 PM

If law enforcement wants to rummage through our Gmail accounts or read our private messages on Facebook, it should be required to go to a judge and get a search warrant. Tell the Senate to pass the Email Privacy Act, and keep the police out of our email.
 
Certain law enforcement groups are pushing for amendments to weaken this standard, and create carve-outs for their particular interests. Please stand firm in ensuring that the Senate passes a "clean" Email Privacy Act. 
 
 
Who are these certain law groups? Are they having a problem catching real criminals out there? Why don't they go after the ones who are sucking us all dry behind these laws and orders. Friggin vampires don't have enough power. Greedy little blood suckers with their intimidation tactics.
 

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 12:58 PM

Hey now. Leave the robots alone. They're only programmed with power trip software in the head leading down to their balls. Rewarded with lulu lullabies to keep them in line.

 


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#3 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 04:26 PM

Staying abreast of important current affairs:
 
U.S. Government Sued Over Refusal to Notify Users of E-mail Searches: Microsoft has sued the Department of Justice, arguing that orders which prevent the company from notifying users about surveillance are unconstitutional. These secrecy orders, issued in connection with orders to disclose users’ private information, arise in thousands of cases each year. EPIC has supported similar challenges to “gag orders" and has opposed the expansion of “no notice” searches. EPIC has also recommended notice requirements for e-mail searches. (Apr. 14, 2016)
 
 
I hope Microsoft fights this hard. They fought the government once and lost big time. They caved - which made me lose respect for their product. I think Apple, IBM, and others should jump on this bandwagon. I know these large corporations have their own agendas in this real life game of thrones. But if they want to continue to exist I think they should look after their customers with more respect and quality. Earn our trust! 
 
This glass ceiling we're all under. Which glass ceiling will break? Where is all that broken glass going to fall? All of us under the dome!

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Posted 11 June 2016 - 08:30 AM

 

Staying abreast of important current affairs:
 
U.S. Government Sued Over Refusal to Notify Users of E-mail Searches: Microsoft has sued the Department of Justice, arguing that orders which prevent the company from notifying users about surveillance are unconstitutional. These secrecy orders, issued in connection with orders to disclose users’ private information, arise in thousands of cases each year. EPIC has supported similar challenges to “gag orders" and has opposed the expansion of “no notice” searches. EPIC has also recommended notice requirements for e-mail searches. (Apr. 14, 2016)
 
 
I hope Microsoft fights this hard. They fought the government once and lost big time. They caved - which made me lose respect for their product. I think Apple, IBM, and others should jump on this bandwagon. I know these large corporations have their own agendas in this real life game of thrones. But if they want to continue to exist I think they should look after their customers with more respect and quality. Earn our trust! 
 
This glass ceiling we're all under. Which glass ceiling will break? Where is all that broken glass going to fall? All of us under the dome!

 

 

Shit. Microshaft, Apple, and the rest are all in kahoots together. They'll bow down to their masters and give in. The industrial complex has decreed this from on high. No one is immune or invisible to the authority given to the beast. Its permissive power to spy with the eye is unlimited. All these arguments are just a show for sheeple to peer at through the screen. Distorting the images of our faces to resemble tweeting twits twerking to the tune of tarnished time.


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#5 RottenApples

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 08:15 AM

Sanctioned violence by an ever increasing sociopathic clique of drones capable of sanctioning the hoi-poiloi to further the goal of complete control over the security of a country. 
 
The Counted
 
 
 
 
This just counts the dead. Perhaps they're the ones who got off lightly. Consider the living. They must pay the piper with sanctions against their person. The suffering incurred by the ever increasing violence associated with the pyramid of authority. Using the brainwashed uniformed clique of badges to process sheep for shearing and slaughter.  Giving permission from on high to commit crimes of the highest order. All within the 'law' and without reprisal. 
 
Remember the Nuremburg excuse? 
 
"I was only following orders"
 

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#6 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 09:14 AM

Your point is a good one OP. Perhaps the dead are the lucky ones!  I suppose it takes a special kind of individual who enjoys violence to some extent to pull the trigger. Maybe the institutions of law profiles people with a propensity for violence to use for their own ends? I heard that police departments hire persons with lower I.Q.s. If this is true then it explains why police themselves don't question the programming they do receive.
 
Another thing... Bullets and beatings aren't the only way to kill. The ever increasing amounts of confiscation laws are a topic of concern. This kills families and society too. Only slower. Like keeping alive a person long enough to suck dry all the value associated with insurance schemes. The process of authority doesn't just include the police. The power in the medical profession to destroy individual rights coincides with all the other groups of authority to keep the chains strong and active. 
 
Real Insurance is only for the ones at the very top. All these so called authoritative entities created insulate them and insure their safety from common lawful reprisal.

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#7 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 03:35 PM

The FBI plans to begin a pilot program early next year that would gather more complete use-of-force data, including information on cases that don't result in death. The earliest participants would be the largest law enforcement agencies, as well as major federal agencies such as the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
 
The program would then be expanded to include additional agencies across the country, which would be expected to regularly disclose whether a use-of-force instance resulted in death, injury or a firearm discharge at or in the direction of a person, according to a notice placed in the Federal Register.
 
"We're looking for ways to make it as public as possible, both for the general public and for people who do research," Lynch said at Georgetown.
 
 

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 01:05 PM

New Ohio Law Stops Cops From Taking Innocent People's Stuff 
 
Ohio Gov. John Kasich ® on Wednesday signed a bill reining in law enforcement’s power to permanently seize property from people who have not been convicted of a crime, and in many cases have not even been charged with one.
 
The bill, HB 347, addresses the controversial practice known as civil asset forfeiture. Police say they use the tool to target the financial proceeds of criminal enterprises, as it allows officers to confiscate cash and property from individuals whom they suspect of being involved in illegal activity, even when officers may not have clear evidence of the supposed crime. But critics say the broad application of civil forfeiture has made it ripe for abuse, and has given rise to a system of policing for profit that lets departments pad their budgets with assets seized from innocent civilians.
 
The new law, set to go into effect by early this year, will take care of a number of key concerns about civil forfeiture in Ohio.
 
HB 347 creates a two-tier system for forfeiture. Cash or property valued at under $15,000 will require a criminal conviction prior to forfeiture. Anything above $15,000 will remain in the civil system, though the bill raises the burden of proof for forfeiture, meaning authorities will first have to show “clear and convincing evidence” that property is linked to criminal activity. Although this is a lower burden of proof than the “beyond a reasonable doubt” standard required for a criminal conviction, it is the highest standard in the civil system.
 

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 01:02 PM

Wait a second here.....I smell marijuana!
 
How Police Officers Seize Cash From Innocent Americans
 

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#10 Digger

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 07:32 PM

When part of the New Zealand town of Turangi became clouded by marijuana smoke, residents did not expect to find it coming from the local police station.
 
After police in the North Island town seized a crop of marijuana, they sought to destroy the plant by burning it in their station furnace.
 
However this method proved half-baked, and suddenly the surrounding area was coated in a plume of rather green smelling smoke.
 
 
 

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