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When you hear these words...


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#1 Red

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 02:13 PM

What pictures come to mind when you hear the words: 
 
 
Bang
 
 
Clank
 
 
Clang
 
 
Sound symbolism. Words that sound like what they are...as symbols that carry meaning. 
 
 
f900d9dd3c5047badb7618eac2a94390.jpg
 
B)
 

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#2 Ludikrus

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 02:16 PM

sound-effects-in-poetry-5-728.jpg?cb=133


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#3 status - Guest

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 02:19 PM

Infancy Gospel of Thomas

 

 7. And Zacchaeus, having written the alphabet in Hebrew, says to Him: Alpha. And the child says: Alpha. And again the teacher: Alpha; and the child likewise. Then again the teacher says the Alpha for the third time. Then Jesus, looking in the master's face, says: How canst thou, not knowing the Alpha, teach another the Beta? And the child, beginning from the Alpha, said by Himself the twenty-two letters. Then also He says again: Hear, O teacher, the order of the first letter, and know how many entrances and lines it has, and strokes common, crossing and coming together.1 And when Zacchaeus heard such an account of the one letter, he was so struck with astonishment, that he could make no answer. And he turned and said to Joseph: This child assuredly, brother, does not belong to the earth. Take him, then, away from me.


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#4 Red

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 06:24 PM

Archaic words are preserved;  perhaps petrified for immortiality. 

These sounds live like Opaque compounds; lexicons morphing through time.

 

img002.gif

 

What counts for a word?  Where do the increments get their meanings?


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#5 status - Buurrp

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 11:46 PM

Can't be unseen or unheard!

 

1249786810412.jpg

 

Do you hear the voices in your head?

 

:chicken:

 


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#6 status - Soup Nazi

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 11:41 AM

il_340x270.397358519_7txc.jpg


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#7 Ludikrus

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 12:04 PM

The Corpus of Historical American English

Bling, bling, bling, bling....
Bring on the dazzle of the swazzle.

Blah, blah, blah, blah....
Moving through the lexicon of usage.

 

Another source link

 

The purpose hear is not to decay a language, but to enrich it.  Shakespeare undersood the materialistic marketing value of words.  At lease those who financed his plays to the public did.  Perhaps they knew the enrichment value being created?  The slang of rap and hipp hop is used to insert new words into society.  Sort of like little rappers shaking their spears.  Only, most of them seem to be only bitching about themselves and blaming others or puffing up their 'bling, bling' look to make themselves bigger than they really are.

 

blingfail.jpg

 

:25:


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#8 status - Guest

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 10:12 AM

-%20522.jpg


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#9 status - Guest

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 01:49 PM

cluck


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#10 Red

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 03:50 PM

Attitudes of people change over time through the use of words.  Definitions and pronunciations change. For a long time, the word mouse meant only the rodent, but it now also refers to a computer device; this metaphorical extension of mouse is quite new. Age of technology and all....

 

LOL-not-ur-mouse.gif

Categories of Semantic Change include generalization, narrowing, amelioration, pejoration, and metaphorical extension.

Generalization encompasses words that get broader in meaning over time.
Example:  It used to mean ‘the smell of spices’ but has now come to mean a smell in general and usually a good smell

Semantic Narrowing encompasses words that get narrower in meaning over time.
Example:  meat (which  used  to  mean  ‘solid food  of  any  kind’)  and wife (which  meant ‘woman’ in  Old English, a meaning preserved in old wives’ tale and midwife)

Amelioration is when a word’s meaning improves or becomes more positive.
Example:  At  the  end  of  the 19th century,  it  meant  ‘a  person  who  is  regarded  as  foolish, offensive, worthless.’ By the mid-20th century, it meant ‘overly diligent student,’ and in the 1980s, it became a ‘person knowledgeable about computers.

Pejoration is when a word’s meaning becomes more negative.
Example:  awful, which  comes  from  ‘worthy  of  awe’  (as  in  “the  awful majesty of God”), now means ‘terrible.

Metaphorical extensions are when speakers  extend  a  word’s  meaning  through  a  metaphorical comparison to something new.
Example:  We  see  metaphorical  change  with  computer  and  Internet technology in such words as windows, web, surf, and mouse.

aboutwindows.jpg

 

We don’t even see these as metaphors anymore. They structure the way we talk, and there is a good probability that they influence the way we habitually think about things.

 

:wub:


Edited by Colorado, 31 August 2015 - 03:50 PM.

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