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Rhetorical Devices Used in Literary Logic

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#1 Red

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 12:42 PM

I thought it would be cool to make a thread about logical fallacies. These little nutcrackers always get in the way of decent discourse. Too bad, too. So I figure learning about them in a little more detail would help distinguish the different types of literary devices used in the everyday media.
 
Today, I'll start off with the ad hominem attack. This one is used constantly. It's a favorite technique because it causes lots of discord among the arguers. It's so much easier to question an individuals personal associations rather than paying attention to the validity of the main argument. Ad hominems can be mistaken as a personal insult when the subtle nature is a different distinction. Blatant and clever insults against somebody make it hard for people to believe it isn't true. If you look at this rationally such techniques never provide a valid reason to disregard decent criticism. 
 
Ad hominem has great power to persuade as it leaves a large impression on the mind of the audience. It somehow causes bias from the audience. This is a flawed arguing technique as it causes judgments to made without evaluation of facts on logical grounds.
 
41675065527de2b7a191ce134ce4917be8718570

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#2 Ludikrus

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 01:43 PM

:Grin9:

 

 

I like Homophones. These are words with different spellings and meanings but sound the same. Like 'soul' and 'sole'.

homophones-8.jpg

They're different from Homographs: which are words that are spelt the same but have different meanings. Like 'spring' which means 'to jump' or a season

zPOChpp.jpg

 

:chuckle:

 

Then we get to Oronyms, which is apparently a word invented by Gyles Brandreth, and quite frankly I wouldn’t put it past him. An Oronym is a sequence of words that sound the same as another, with endless comic possibilities. The brain hears speech not as individual words but as an overall flow which it has to try to interpret, and what with accents and mispronunciation and slang, it’s hardly surprising that occasionally we get it wrong.

“The stuffy nose can lead to problems.”

“The stuff he knows can lead to problems.”

Actually, by far the best example I can give of Oronyms at work is the Four Candles sketch by the Two Ronnies.

http://www.murderati...nd-mondegreens/



https://youtu.be/OCbvCRkl_4U

 


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#3 Feathers

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 02:01 PM

:bumpsmall:

 

and pinned!

 

:dancing-hatching-chicken-smiley


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#4 Red

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 02:38 PM

Thank you for the pin!

 

:Idea1:

 

Analogies are fun. They're little ideas comparing one thing to another using a familiar thing. Metaphors and similes are used to build an analogy.
 
"The structure of the universal mind is like the galaxies, stars, and planets expanding ever outward toward infinity."
 
The universal mind is compared to the constellations using "like". This is a simile. A metaphor relates it to the expanding infinity without using words like "like" or "as".
 
Graphic analogies are useful too!
 
05pmoWs.gif

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#5 Red

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 03:29 PM

Allegory is a wonderful way to tell a story. They're used for stories that teach ideas and principles. Usually with a moral outlook. Allegory is often confused with symbolism. Allegory includes actions and characters to stand in for ideas. Symbols don't tell a story. An example would be Plato's cave story: it tells how some people stand in ignorant chains and others see the light. Allegory allows people to express layers of meaning within there own stories. 
 
A literary example of allegory would be "Animal Farm", by George Orwell. 
 
“All animals are equal but a few are more equal than others.”
 
animated-gif-allegory-57400.gif

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#6 status - Ghost

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 04:00 PM

Great thread idea OP. Looking up examples about this subject I noticed most of the videos about specific fallacies are made in India. Maybe that's just the cookie monster feeding me free samples...
 
:chuckle:
 
This one involves a little thinking. It gives a decent explanation of syllogisms.
 
Systematically solve any syllogism problem within a minute without using Venn diagram. This method is called Aristotle's method and it is highly effective, just like solving two mathematical equation.
 
 
 
 

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#7 Feathers

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 04:20 PM

 

Great thread idea OP. Looking up examples about this subject I noticed most of the videos about specific fallacies are made in India. Maybe that's just the cookie monster feeding me free samples...
 
:chuckle:
 
This one involves a little thinking. It gives a decent explanation of syllogisms.
 
Systematically solve any syllogism problem within a minute without using Venn diagram. This method is called Aristotle's method and it is highly effective, just like solving two mathematical equation.
 
 

 

 

:funny-chicken-dancing:

 

crazychickenstory.jpg

Therefore you are a chicken. Isn't that something?

 

:smiley-laughing024:


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#8 status - Ghost

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 06:24 PM

false-dilemma.gif


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#9 Red

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 11:35 AM

Are you tired of hearing the same type of stories over and over again? Does the news you see everyday seem commonplace? Warn-out stories told in repetitive fashion. Are the events portrayed becoming predictable? If so, you could be the victim of a Cliché. 
 
Cliches and Composition Theory
 
 
A cliché is a traditional form of human expression (in words, thoughts, emotions, gestures, acts) which–due to repetitive use in social life–has lost its original, often ingenious heuristic power. Although it thus fails positively to contribute meaning to social interactions and communication, it does function socially, since it manages to stimulate behavior (cognition, emotion, volition, action), while it avoids reflection on meanings.
 
- Anton C. Zijderveld
  “On Clichés”
 
f54ad86939e076d1c2b3cd98fd510edd.jpg

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#10 Forster Woods

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 12:46 PM

:funny-chicken-dancing:

 

Therefore you are a chicken. Isn't that something?

 

:smiley-laughing024:

 

:chuckle:

 

http://forum.chicken...is-on-the-wall/

 

np_cliche_7.jpg

 

:wink:


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