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Rhetorical Devices Used in Literary Logic

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#121 RottenApples

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Posted 20 August 2017 - 01:50 PM

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Sometimes personification gets confused with a pathetic fallacy. This is a kind of personification that provides emotional life into natural inanimate objects. For example, they reflect the nature of moods and desires into the features of the wind.
 
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Throw more anthropomorphism into this mix. This is when people give human traits and mannerisms to animals or everyday objects. It's a bit different from personification; that just creates an image from a set of characteristics. Anthropomorphism seeks to make an animal behave as an actual human being. Stories and fables of all kinds use them for their allegorical value. Animal Farm is a good example. It provides a sense of imagery that is attractive to larger audiences and serves as an outlet for intense political satire. Younger audiences respond well to this technique. Disney can attest to that!

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#122 status - Guest

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Posted 20 August 2017 - 02:01 PM

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#123 status - Postie McFly

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 12:54 PM

 

Alliteration is a great technique to add style in speech. It occurs when words are strung together using the same consonant sound close together. They can be can quite fancy and interesting because it requires more emphasis on the sounds produced. They add a musical and poetic essence to phrasing and they're rhythmic in nature. Making them easy to learn because it creates a flow in the sentence structure. 
 
Alliteration is used extensively in the marketing industry because they make the brand names pop with clarity and are easy to remember. It's best to use them sparely as they tend to get monotonous. Stringing 2 words together in this way can strengthen an idea for some short sharp shocks.
 
When it's really well done they really add some kick....
 
:happy:
 
 

 

 

I like Language that creates a musical effect.
 
:drummer:
 
Alliteration is cool.
 
:happy:
 
Another type is Sibilance.
 
It still uses repeated consonants to create rhythms but sibilance uses the softer ones.
 
Especially the SSSSSS. It creates a hissing like quality. Sh, ch, and th are included. Others are the z, x, f, and the soft c.
 
Using sibilant phrasing allows for colorful attention to flowing expression.
 
Also related to onomatopoeia: words that imitate natural sounds.
 

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#124 status - WikiChicki

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 05:12 PM

:Grin9:

 

 

I like Homophones. These are words with different spellings and meanings but sound the same. Like 'soul' and 'sole'.

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They're different from Homographs: which are words that are spelt the same but have different meanings. Like 'spring' which means 'to jump' or a season

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:chuckle:

 

Then we get to Oronyms, which is apparently a word invented by Gyles Brandreth, and quite frankly I wouldn’t put it past him. An Oronym is a sequence of words that sound the same as another, with endless comic possibilities. The brain hears speech not as individual words but as an overall flow which it has to try to interpret, and what with accents and mispronunciation and slang, it’s hardly surprising that occasionally we get it wrong.

“The stuffy nose can lead to problems.”

“The stuff he knows can lead to problems.”

Actually, by far the best example I can give of Oronyms at work is the Four Candles sketch by the Two Ronnies.

http://www.murderati...nd-mondegreens/



https://youtu.be/OCbvCRkl_4U

 

 

A related term...

 

Polysemy - One word used to describe different things. Also can include phrases, symbolic poetic imagery, and different forms of jargon. Example: Look up the word monster in webster. Then look up the same word in an old law dictionary. Some words have up to 30 meanings. They're meant to hit the senses on a deeper level. They are always done on purpose (this is the main difference between the above related homophones) and are especially used in an historical sense; over time words change their meaning but can still be twisted to serve more than one purpose of meaning.
 
Perhaps this is why it is difficult to teach these in class. It relates to etymology (origins of words) which takes time and study. Worthy study for a greater historical sense in meaning. 
 
Often, judging how Polysemes are related makes them ambiguous and vague in nature. I think this works with all languages in one form or another as problems arise when non-native speakers learn a new language. At least it's seen when learning English. Inside information can be conveyed using this device. 
 

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#125 status - Lickety Split

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 12:49 AM

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#126 status - Guest

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 02:46 AM

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#127 Red

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 03:34 PM

 

A related term...

 

Polysemy - One word used to describe different things. Also can include phrases, symbolic poetic imagery, and different forms of jargon. Example: Look up the word monster in webster. Then look up the same word in an old law dictionary. Some words have up to 30 meanings. They're meant to hit the senses on a deeper level. They are always done on purpose (this is the main difference between the above related homophones) and are especially used in an historical sense; over time words change their meaning but can still be twisted to serve more than one purpose of meaning.
 
Perhaps this is why it is difficult to teach these in class. It relates to etymology (origins of words) which takes time and study. Worthy study for a greater historical sense in meaning. 
 
Often, judging how Polysemes are related makes them ambiguous and vague in nature. I think this works with all languages in one form or another as problems arise when non-native speakers learn a new language. At least it's seen when learning English. Inside information can be conveyed using this device. 

 

 

:Bump:

 

I found this post about 'twilight language' to be apt:

 

http://forum.chicken...-great/?p=11350


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#128 status - Homonhim

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 10:22 PM

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#129 status - Bogus Bombardment

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Posted 19 September 2017 - 12:59 PM

 

I thought it would be cool to make a thread about logical fallacies. These little nutcrackers always get in the way of decent discourse. Too bad, too. So I figure learning about them in a little more detail would help distinguish the different types of literary devices used in the everyday media.
 
Today, I'll start off with the ad hominem attack. This one is used constantly. It's a favorite technique because it causes lots of discord among the arguers. It's so much easier to question an individuals personal associations rather than paying attention to the validity of the main argument. Ad hominems can be mistaken as a personal insult when the subtle nature is a different distinction. Blatant and clever insults against somebody make it hard for people to believe it isn't true. If you look at this rationally such techniques never provide a valid reason to disregard decent criticism. 
 
Ad hominem has great power to persuade as it leaves a large impression on the mind of the audience. It somehow causes bias from the audience. This is a flawed arguing technique as it causes judgments to made without evaluation of facts on logical grounds.
 
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SNARK!

 
Don't cha just love the sound of this word? It's so sharp and snakey. Always good with an exclamation point! This word means a snide and sarcastic comment. They can be both wildly stupid or incredibly clever. Depending on the point of view. It combines cynicisms with blended wit. They'r usually quick little quips to tease someone into an emotional response. Derisive in nature they can and will at times cut deep into the psyche. It can be used as a defensive device to cut away at an individual like an ad hominem attack. Most of the time snarks are used to mask points of view.
 
 
 
:chuckle: 

 

 

 

 

:GoldenSmile1:

 

216c7991c913f3696dababc95cff0ec5--funny-

 

A really effective rhetorical device we hear a lot in todays world is sarcasm. Most people know what it is, what it feels like, where to direct it; both on the sending and receiving end of things. It can be used as a witty comeback or an avoidance to an uncomfortable situation. It deflects attention away from embarrassing moments and can be used to hide uncomfortable feelings.
 
They are used to express a mocking attitude towards an object, person or an idea. They can be used in a satirical comment with the specific purpose of destroying another's opinion. Sarcasm can be cruel, amusing, pointed, and biting. It is used to dig into anothers emotional center of being. An attack on the spirit.
 
Delivery of Sarcasm is key.
 
There are 7 basic types of tone to consider when employing its biting commentary:
 
Self-Deprecating Sarcasm - Inferior, worthless
Brooding Sarcasm - Polite bitterness
Deadpan Sarcasm - Without emotion
Polite Sarcasm - Delayed effect; listener must think about it to get it.
Obnoxious Sarcasm - The kind that makes a listener wanna crack a skull.
Manic Sarcasm - Delivered with an unnaturally happy mood
Raging Sarcasm - exaggerated violent threats
 
Here's a decent link I've found describing these tones in more detail:
 

 

 

Using these expressions is like a game of Battleship. We use them to lob missles into the inner being of an individual or group. It's a hit and miss kind of thing. But, lo and behold, they can create tremendous results. Especially when a hit is scored. It triggers responses on both sides of the coin. These things can be easily noticed on social sites and media outlets. Attacking the integrity and character instead of the issue being discussed. The age old sophist attitude of win, win, win comes into play. 
 
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