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Rhetorical Devices Used in Literary Logic

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 01:50 PM

 

58 cognitive biases that screw up everything we do
 
We like to think we're rational human beings. 
 
In fact, we are prone to hundreds of proven biases that cause us to think and act irrationally, and even thinking we're rational despite evidence of irrationality in others is known as blind spot bias.
 
The study of how often human beings do irrational things was enough for psychologist Daniel Kahneman to win the Nobel Prize in Economics, and it opened the rapidly expanding field of behavioral economics. Similar insights are also reshaping everything from marketing to criminology.
 
Hoping to clue you — and ourselves — into the biases that frame our decisions, we've collected a long list of the most notable ones.
 
This is an update of an article that was previously published, with additional contributions by Drake Baer.
 
 
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:chuckle:

 

Logical fallacy leads us right into cognitive bias. In fact fallacy creates bias of all kinds. The trick in alleviating any confusion created is to ask yourself which bias' apply to your own opinion. That is if you're willing to admit your own thinking may be flawed ...

 

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#142 status - Horse Muffins

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 09:15 PM

:chuckle:

 

Logical fallacy leads us right into cognitive bias. In fact fallacy creates bias of all kinds. The trick in alleviating any confusion created is to ask yourself which bias' apply to your own opinion. That is if you're willing to admit your own thinking may be flawed ...

 

:NiceThread1:

 

That means taking time for a little self discovery.
 
Are you the main character of the story of your life?
 
How many diapers have you changed?
 
What if all the cognitive bias' are like a novel going on in your head?
 
I suppose a famous novelist could have something great to say about the question at hand. I'd love to hear any of them.
 
Something like creating characters to fit certain personas to carry on specific story lines in ones life. One for work. One for play. One for when you think no one is looking. As long as you manage to not lie to yourself (even with the characterizations) a certain sense of balance can be achieved. Doing your own biography and dividing it up into different phases of your life helps to slow down emotional outbursts. Knowing your own triggers and their histories and creating characters for them shapes a new form of understanding within the self. Answering truthfully to yourself why others seemed to get in the way of an instant satisfaction or a personal agenda. The stages, the ups and downs, and everything sideways and in between that comes with being too selfish.
 
I think understanding your own personal history helps to listen to another's POV with a more patient bearing. Contingent upon being totally honest with yourself....at least. Very hard thing to do in this world filled with chains of desires and addictions to numerous to count. Never lie to yourself. 
 
Honesty with others? That depends on so many factors working together. Tricky Dicky, Murphy and his cohorts, and Finnigans wake always get in the way. How many times does a person screw themselves in life by hurting another?
 
I guess learning to be a narrator in the story of your life helps bring a balance to things. After all, it is just A story. One of many. Is it a good one? Is the hidden diary of your heart honest? Or is just told with fancy jargon and bloated juxtaposition bringing the victor (yourself) all the spoils of triumph without paying a price. Sanitizing the tale for future generations to follow and possibly emulate. What lies we tell ourselves to make it all better.
 
How many monuments to the self in history have been erected?
How many of them do we look up to still or even remember?
How many are we going to tear down?
 
What about our own personal monuments to ourselves?
 
They offer an array of satire to describe all sorts of ludicrous nonsense from politics to the small things in everyday life about ourselves. Including everybody involved in our own little worlds. 
 
Don't forget about the giant individuals of influence who affect all our everyday lives. Their sspheres of influence are large.
 
Still, many more are beginning to pay attention to larger worlds around them. Especially through the internet. The influences that control our lives. Layer by layer. The little ones, the big ones. Right on up to the top of the pyramid....grouped in categories to better serve you.
 
:chuckle:
 
 

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#143 Red

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 10:05 PM

:bumpsmall:

 

:falling_leaves3:

 

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#144 Red

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 12:43 PM

 

How can I make a thread of this nature without including metaphors?
 
Metaphors are one of the most common types of speech. They add a sort of definition and color because they describe a comparison between two things that are most often apart except for a common characteristic that can link the two together. A noun or a verb can be described as something different. 
 
An example comparing a chef to a writer. Learning to write can be visualized with cooking skills. One must learn to bake, roast, chop, and cut. Including all the little things that go with it through practice and experience. They're great for sharpening the imagination and to give further understanding in communicating ideas 
 
Metaphors are different from similes in that they don't use terms like "like" or "as" to compare two things. Metaphors make hidden comparisons. Portraying one thing as being something else but not that something else. There is an implied implicit meaning.
 
animals-fox-chicken_farm-poultry_farms-i
 
:chuckle:

 

 

 

 

Irony is a literary technique & rhetoric device that has been used for many years in speech, art and everyday life. Although irony has been used for a long time, there hasn’t been an exact definition of irony. There have been hundreds of definitions suggested over the years, however, a general consensus is that:
 
Irony is a figure of speech which is a contradiction or incongruity between what is expected and what actually occurs.
 
Most of the definitions of irony are something along these lines, though there is often disagreement about the specific meaning of this term.
 
 
:Grin8:

 

 

:bumpsmall:

 

Reading between the lines of Irony...

 

http://forum.chicken...eading/?p=13322

 

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