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Rhetorical Devices Used in Literary Logic

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#31 status - Guest

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 11:36 AM

 

The video reminds me of Zoomorphism. Using animal or other material characteristics to associate with non-animal objects. These can include humans, gods, and other non-human entities.
 
giphy.gif
 
The opposite of this would be anthropomorphism. Which assigns human qualities into animals and other objects. It's a great way to describe different charcters and create symbolic language to add spice to your illustrations.
 
4e1ca2df4eb3054a6e989a7ac9e0d462.jpg

 

 

figurative-language-48-638.jpg

 


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#32 Red

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 11:45 AM

How can I make a thread of this nature without including metaphors?
 
Metaphors are one of the most common types of speech. They add a sort of definition and color because they describe a comparison between two things that are most often apart except for a common characteristic that can link the two together. A noun or a verb can be described as something different. 
 
An example comparing a chef to a writer. Learning to write can be visualized with cooking skills. One must learn to bake, roast, chop, and cut. Including all the little things that go with it through practice and experience. They're great for sharpening the imagination and to give further understanding in communicating ideas 
 
Metaphors are different from similes in that they don't use terms like "like" or "as" to compare two things. Metaphors make hidden comparisons. Portraying one thing as being something else but not that something else. There is an implied implicit meaning.
 
animals-fox-chicken_farm-poultry_farms-i
 
:chuckle:
 
 

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#33 status - Guest

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 03:14 PM

1582f5a11e918b6433bf052b9314522f25316664


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#34 Wicked

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 03:48 PM

Innuendo is a fancy term indicating indirect communication. Usually naughty and useful in a passive aggressive insult or compliment. They're great at attacking or tempting the character of anybody they're directed too. Innuendo is best seen in scenes of satire where it forms witty and crude criticisms.
 
Do you smoke?
 
dark_passage.gif
 
:tongue:
 
 

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#35 Jesse Jimmie

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 03:56 PM

F5jfX.gif

 

:chuckle:


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To Cluck or not to Cluck, that is the question...


#36 Red

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 05:40 PM

figurative-language-48-638.jpg

 

Sometimes personification gets confused with a pathetic fallacy. This is a kind of personification that provides emotional life into natural inanimate objects. For example, they reflect the nature of moods and desires into the features of the wind.
 
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#37 Ludikrus

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 03:20 PM

Shall we speak of hubris this morning?

 

This is a literary concept designed to show a characters ignorance and pride. These types of characters usually have over inflated egos. They hold positions of power that cross examine their own moral codes and they usually break them and form new ones. They delight in causing shame in others just for the fun of it. Revenge is not hubris. Hubris is when one thinks themselves better than another. Sometimes it becomes so great as to leave an individual thinking he is equal to god. Always leading the character to try and defy nature and bring about destruction for everyone concerned.

http://forum.chicken...complex/?p=3009

 

 


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#38 status - Twain

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 12:57 PM

Bildungsroman
 
Do you enjoy coming of age stories? 
 
You know the ones.... 
 
These stories are usually psychological and spiritual in nature. The ones where a lesson is learned to show the growth of the main characters. Their is a word to describe these types of moral stories and it is known as Bildungsroman. We see the ups and downs of the protagonist from an early age onward. All the hardships, the suffering, the pain, and the glories associated with overcoming the negative aspects throughout a period of time or a whole lifetime. 
 
The Harry Potter series is a good example of a Bildungsroman. We see lots of characters with all kinds of different temperaments growing into their characters. 
 
And then, of course, there is Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. 
 
Two of the best examples you'll ever have a chance to meet....

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#39 status - Finn

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 01:20 PM

Colloquialisms are cool. 
 
Who better at them than old Mark Twain. 
 
:cool:
 
Colloquialisms are words, phrases, and slang terms which characters in a group or society use to talk in real life. Sometimes they can be offensive. Perhaps that's why Huck Finn has been on a ban list in some town or another since it was first published.
 
Huck Finn’s Censorship History
 
 
 
 

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#40 Red

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 11:42 AM

I like those above Twainisms. Maybe they should be a legitimate category in rhetoric.

 

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