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Rhetorical Devices Used in Literary Logic

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#51 status - Nessie

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 05:04 PM

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#52 status - Ghost

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 11:41 PM

Hegelian Dialectic
 
The Hegelian Dialectic is a device used by governments and various actors to influence the public sentiment and cause a desired change in social values. 
 
In simple terms,
 
1. create a problem by artificial means.  
 
2. wait for a pre-determined response. 
 
3. use the response to propose a pre-determined solution.
 
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#53 Red

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 01:41 PM

The english language has a great tendency to borrow words from other languages. Giving it the capacity to add great color in its phrasing. It allows for a myriad of repetive phrasing with different words that have similar meanings. Expressing the same idea two or more times. 
 
This is known as Tautology. 
 
Sometimes Tautology is confused with repetition. Using words that have similar meanings over and over again. Tautology uses the repetition of ideas by including recurring words and phrases. With Tautology it's the idea that counts. 
 
It does provide a problem with too much repetition and can be quite redundant in its monotonous blather. Think of how media uses this technique. Every news outlet is basically telling the same story - only with different colorings. 
 
In this advertising example we have the same phrase repeated. The image portrays different scenarios.
 
shampoo-ad-tautology.jpg
 
 

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#54 status - Chicken Soup

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 02:11 PM

YOGI BERRA was one of the best catchers in baseball history, he is nonetheless as well known for what he said away from the baseball diamond as what he did on it. In the words of the New York Post, which has published 35 famous Berra quotes, he “creatively butchered the English language”. 
 
 
Mr Berra’s most-quoted phrase is: “It ain’t over until it’s over.” Taken as propositional logic, this is informationless: of course it isn’t. But take a similar phrase many people use today: “It is what it is.” This would also seem totally contentless—and yet people don’t say it without a reason. They mean that there’s no use pretending the facts aren’t what they are. In the same way, the Yogi-ism isn't a self-contained proposition: it highlights what isn’t said. Until the last out is made in the last inning, there is everything to play for—especially in baseball, which has no clock. A comeback is always possible.
 
 
The issue here is about THOUGHT, not language. Let observe first that the majority of BERRA’s aphorisms involves the manifestation of either an oxymoron or a tautology.  An oxymoron is a virulent contradiction in terms, for example when he says: A nickel isn’t worth a dime today. A tautology is a virulent redundancy in terms, for example when he says: I take a two hours nap between 1 PM and 3 PM. Looked at superficially, oxymorons and tautologies seem absurd simply because of the blatant aggression they represent to our sacrosanct common sense. We will try to demonstrate here that Yogi BERRA’s philosophical intervention is actually to be seen as a deep and constant subversion of the simplistic idea of what EVIDENCE (verbally formulated in the tautology) or CONTRADICTION (verbally formulated in the oxymoron) are.
 
An important amount of the reflection contained in BERRAISMS is about the inner contradictions of knowledge, more precisely, of understanding in the sense of classical rationalist philosophy:
 
YOU CAN OBSERVE A LOT JUST BY WATCHING
 
YOU CAN SEE A LOT BY OBSERVING
 
 

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#55 status - Great Scott

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 02:26 PM

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#56 Red

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 03:02 PM

SNARK!

 
Don't cha just love the sound of this word? It's so sharp and snakey. Always good with an exclamation point! This word means a snide and sarcastic comment. They can be both wildly stupid or incredibly clever. Depending on the point of view. It combines cynicisms with blended wit. They'r usually quick little quips to tease someone into an emotional response. Derisive in nature they can and will at times cut deep into the psyche. It can be used as a defensive device to cut away at an individual like an ad hominem attack. Most of the time snarks are used to mask points of view.
 
 
 
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#57 MrChips

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 06:00 PM

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Five star thread OP!

 

:hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:

 

The art of argumentation can be used against those who don't appreciate it's forms and structure as an art for distraction.

 
Skillful argumentation is an antidote to productive communication.  It offers a way to eliminate bickering, anger, fear, and all the trash that prevents decent control of oneself. It's both an informal and formal method of debate leading to agreement by examining claims and justification by focusing on the interaction of argument, Itself!.
 
I'd like to think humanity has upgraded itself since Homer, Aristotle, and the countless others who began the art of conversation. Setting conditions of claims and evidence and shifting it all around with inference and warrants. The whole point of reasonable argument is to look for resolution.  This only works, of course, with reasonable people. Closed minds and using physical force can obviously kill any argument, anytime!

 

 

Ethos, Pathos, and Logos

 
Rhetorical appeals and their uses:
 
Ethos refers to how trust worthy a person is. Ethos is used to appeal to a moral philosophy or reliable integrity. It attempts to signify credibility within the speaker.  It is effective as a strategy because it automatically inserts belief in the speakers credibility because of a higher educational or moral being. A doctor is good example. People hold a doctors power of reasoning in high regard. Same with a judge because a certain trust is automatically implied. It can used to challenge the reliability or moral stance in an argument. 
 
Pathos is another powerful device. They appeal to emotions. It's always loaded with vivid illustrations that trigger emotional buttons. The speaker wants the listener or reader to be persuaded by the emotional value this type of argument can generate. Packed with sympathy and empathy they dim the analytical processing of rational thought. The more people react to this type of rhetoric the more they become least likely to ask the big question(s). Like WHY? In many instances they're used in calls to action within a group or society.
 
Logos denotes an appeal to logic and reasoning. Logos is tricky because it relies on theories and abstract language. They include definitions, factual data, and statistics. Including learned comments by authoritative sources and Ethos driven opinions. Logos tries to give the best sources and reasoning. Appeals are taken as matter of facts and are useful in persuading others to believe a conclusion. 
 
 

 

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#58 status - Armamentarium

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 06:35 PM

Yes. This is a good thread. I like the way these tried and true rhetorical tools are defined with brevity. The examples amplify the definitions with an exaggerated and clever sense of humor too. 
 
:chuckle:
 
Here's a list that may be of interest:
 
AP Language and Composition
 
Glossary of Literary and Rhetorical Devices
 

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#59 Red

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 04:43 PM

 

Yes. This is a good thread. I like the way these tried and true rhetorical tools are defined with brevity. The examples amplify the definitions with an exaggerated and clever sense of humor too. 
 
:chuckle:
 
Here's a list that may be of interest:
 
AP Language and Composition
 
Glossary of Literary and Rhetorical Devices
 

 

 

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#60 Red

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 04:58 PM

Alliteration is a great technique to add style in speech. It occurs when words are strung together using the same consonant sound close together. They can be can quite fancy and interesting because it requires more emphasis on the sounds produced. They add a musical and poetic essence to phrasing and they're rhythmic in nature. Making them easy to learn because it creates a flow in the sentence structure. 
 
Alliteration is used extensively in the marketing industry because they make the brand names pop with clarity and are easy to remember. It's best to use them sparely as they tend to get monotonous. Stringing 2 words together in this way can strengthen an idea for some short sharp shocks.
 
When it's really well done they really add some kick....
 
:happy:
 
 
 
 
 

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