Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 6 votes

Rhetorical Devices Used in Literary Logic

common fears

66 replies to this topic

#61 status - Dumbledork

status - Dumbledork
  • Guests

Posted 20 June 2017 - 11:43 AM

orwell+man.jpg


  • 0

#62 RottenApples

RottenApples

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 20 June 2017 - 12:16 PM

 

Today, I'll start off with the ad hominem attack. This one is used constantly. It's a favorite technique because it causes lots of discord among the arguers. It's so much easier to question an individuals personal associations rather than paying attention to the validity of the main argument. Ad hominems can be mistaken as a personal insult when the subtle nature is a different distinction. Blatant and clever insults against somebody make it hard for people to believe it isn't true. If you look at this rationally such techniques never provide a valid reason to disregard decent criticism. 
 
Ad hominem has great power to persuade as it leaves a large impression on the mind of the audience. It somehow causes bias from the audience. This is a flawed arguing technique as it causes judgments to made without evaluation of facts on logical grounds.
 

 

 

Look!
 
More Insults...
 
:Hammer:
 
Dysphemism is a common rhetorical device used everywhere in the media. 
 
It is used to kill reputations and insult the character. 
 
Basically, it is the use of offensive language as opposed to an inoffensive one. 
 
Taking the positive and turning it into a negative is the goal. 
 
It can be non verbal as well. 
 
67b07bf7a171e83bf755e424778ec78b.jpg
 
The purpose of dysphemism is to insult a group and create more social distance. 
 
Flaring up the emotions to action. 
 
Motivations to use this form of speech are to incite fear and anger.
 
Prevalent in politics and hate speech.
 
They are opposite to Euphemisms. 
 
Which are positive expressions in place of negative ones.
 
euphemism%2Bbb.jpg
 
:chuckle:

  • 1

#63 Red

Red

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 128 posts
  • LocationUSA

Posted 20 June 2017 - 01:27 PM

Do you like to Internet?
 
Are you worth your weight in Good?
 
How would you like a bag of Happy?
 
Did the words internet, good, and happy seem a bit out of place to you?
 
Converting words and forcing them into unexpected grammatical styles is known as anthimeria. It involves changing adjectives into nouns, nouns into verbs, and adjectives into adverbs. It is a common practice in advertising. Simply put: It's a conversion of expression by changing one word class to another. The goal is to produce a striking effect by jumping from one meaning to another. Tickling the brain with an image or insight. Not to be confused with nominalization. Which is turning verbs into nouns.
 
tumblr_ln0vg8CJ3Y1qlaajjo1_500.jpg

  • 0

#64 status - Finn

status - Finn
  • Guests

Posted 21 June 2017 - 01:25 PM

 

Colloquialisms are cool. 
 
Who better at them than old Mark Twain. 
 
:cool:
 
Colloquialisms are words, phrases, and slang terms which characters in a group or society use to talk in real life. Sometimes they can be offensive. Perhaps that's why Huck Finn has been on a ban list in some town or another since it was first published.
 
Huck Finn’s Censorship History
 

 

 

 

I like those above Twainisms. Maybe they should be a legitimate category in rhetoric.

 

:funny-chicken-dancing:

 

That's one of my favorite styles of colloquialism - The Vernacular. Twain was a master at it. Finding the common, everyday voice when reading a book. Leaving out the academic high brow way of speaking when reading the written word. Readers like to hear the voices in the story. Informal voices with correct grammar are often most appealing to a reader.  

 


  • 0

#65 status - Egg Noodles

status - Egg Noodles
  • Guests

Posted 21 June 2017 - 04:22 PM

 

How can I make a thread of this nature without including metaphors?
 
:chuckle: 
 
Metaphors are one of the most common types of speech. They add a sort of definition and color because they describe a comparison between two things that are most often apart except for a common characteristic that can link the two together. A noun or a verb can be described as something different. 
 
An example comparing a chef to a writer. Learning to write can be visualized with cooking skills. One must learn to bake, roast, chop, and cut. Including all the little things that go with it through practice and experience. They're great for sharpening the imagination and to give further understanding in communicating ideas 
 
Metaphors are different from similes in that they don't use terms like "like" or "as" to compare two things. Metaphors make hidden comparisons. Portraying one thing as being something else but not that something else. There is an implied implicit meaning.
 
animals-fox-chicken_farm-poultry_farms-i
 
:chuckle:

 

 

Irony is a literary technique & rhetoric device that has been used for many years in speech, art and everyday life. Although irony has been used for a long time, there hasn’t been an exact definition of irony. There have been hundreds of definitions suggested over the years, however, a general consensus is that:
 
Irony is a figure of speech which is a contradiction or incongruity between what is expected and what actually occurs.
 
Most of the definitions of irony are something along these lines, though there is often disagreement about the specific meaning of this term.
 
 
:Grin8:

  • 0

#66 Red

Red

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 128 posts
  • LocationUSA

Posted 22 June 2017 - 01:33 PM

 

Irony is a literary technique & rhetoric device that has been used for many years in speech, art and everyday life. Although irony has been used for a long time, there hasn’t been an exact definition of irony. There have been hundreds of definitions suggested over the years, however, a general consensus is that:
 
Irony is a figure of speech which is a contradiction or incongruity between what is expected and what actually occurs.
 
Most of the definitions of irony are something along these lines, though there is often disagreement about the specific meaning of this term.
 
 
:Grin8:

 

 

:Grin_Jump3:

 

You cheated.

 

That's pasta.

 

:chuckle:


  • 0

#67 Red

Red

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 128 posts
  • LocationUSA

Posted 22 June 2017 - 01:52 PM

Here's some more devices that offer rhythm and melodic meter to text and speech:
 
Epizeuxis or diacope
 
These are words or phrases that are repeated in a rapid succession within the same sentence to emphasize a point or idea. 
 
The purpose of epizeuxis is to create greater emotion to the listener or reader. Jabbing the air with emphasis, it motivates and inspires a memorable focus on thoughts and ideas through deep sentiment. 
 
giphy.gif
 
Because of its repetive nature it also inspires memorization of ideas on a sub-conscious level. These devices are used as artistic effects in lyrics, prose and poetry. How many songs have you heard that use these techniques? Have you ever considered the ideas presented in the lyrics of your favorite songs? 
 
There are two other terms that use the same technique. 
 
One is an Epistrophe. 
 
These are repetitive words or phrases at the end of sentences that call attention to a point of interest. 
 
CxNPzvY.jpg
 
The opposite of this effect brings us to the second term. 
 
Anaphora - basically the same definition as Epistrophe except they come at the beginning of sentences. 
 
anaphora.jpg
 
:Flying:

  • 0



Reply to this topic



  



Similar Topics Collapse


4 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 4 guests, 0 anonymous users

IPB Skin By Virteq