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Rhetorical Devices Used in Literary Logic

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#71 status - Guest

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 03:48 PM

You can include a page that also contains an Include instruction. The page Including the include instruction is included when you paginate the document but the included referred to in its Include instruction is not included. 

 

:chuckle:

 


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#72 RottenApples

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 11:43 AM

 

Alliteration is a great technique to add style in speech. It occurs when words are strung together using the same consonant sound close together. They can be can quite fancy and interesting because it requires more emphasis on the sounds produced. They add a musical and poetic essence to phrasing and they're rhythmic in nature. Making them easy to learn because it creates a flow in the sentence structure. 
 
Alliteration is used extensively in the marketing industry because they make the brand names pop with clarity and are easy to remember. It's best to use them sparely as they tend to get monotonous. Stringing 2 words together in this way can strengthen an idea for some short sharp shocks.
 
When it's really well done they really add some kick....
 
:happy:
 
 

 

 

Playing with morphemes for their sound effects can be either harsh sounding or sweet. Using words and phrases with soothing sounds can create a pleasing effect to the listener. Let's look at the use of sounds in language.
 
One example is Euphony: This uses pleasing vowels and nasal consonants to create harmony. Using it combined with Alliteration creates a wider range of melodic effects. Poetry and prose are good mediums to uses these devices in. The use of long vowels builds on the melody. Pleasing pronunciations produce poetic harmony. They sooth the speech and carry the language forward with effective commentary. 
 
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Cacophony, on the other hand, is harsh and explosive in its delivery. Words that hiss, crack, and screech using heavy consonants bend the ear with unpleasant discord. Its use is usually for descriptions of unpleasant situations. 
 
cacophony-1.jpg

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#73 RottenApples

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 10:14 AM

Exemplum: Figure of amplification using an example, brief or extended, real or fictitious, to illustrate a point; an example.
 
"All this stuff you've heard about America not wanting to fight, wanting to stay out of the war, is a lot of horse dung. Americans, traditionally, love to fight. All real Americans love the sting of battle. When you were kids, you all admired the champion marble shooter, the fastest runner, the big league ball players, the toughest boxers. Americans love a winner and will not tolerate a loser. Americans play to win all the time. Now, I wouldn't give a hoot in hell for a man who lost and laughed."
 
 
One of the widest devices used in rhetoric is the use of telling short stories to describe an idea that has a moral point to it. All those little legends and folktales you heard as a kid are good examples of what can be defined as EXEMPLUM. These little stories focus the attention on a characters good or bad features. Preachers employ this method as well as using a parable to make a moral point. The moral lessons in Exempla are told at the outset of story. While a parable the lesson usually comes at the end.
 
Diogenes_a3a908_5489074.jpg

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#74 status - Critique Mystique

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 10:50 AM

:Grin8:

 

Five star thread OP!

 

:hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:

 

 

Ethos, Pathos, and Logos

 
Rhetorical appeals and their uses:
 
Ethos refers to how trust worthy a person is. Ethos is used to appeal to a moral philosophy or reliable integrity. It attempts to signify credibility within the speaker.  It is effective as a strategy because it automatically inserts belief in the speakers credibility because of a higher educational or moral being. A doctor is good example. People hold a doctors power of reasoning in high regard. Same with a judge because a certain trust is automatically implied. It can used to challenge the reliability or moral stance in an argument. 
 
Pathos is another powerful device. They appeal to emotions. It's always loaded with vivid illustrations that trigger emotional buttons. The speaker wants the listener or reader to be persuaded by the emotional value this type of argument can generate. Packed with sympathy and empathy they dim the analytical processing of rational thought. The more people react to this type of rhetoric the more they become least likely to ask the big question(s). Like WHY? In many instances they're used in calls to action within a group or society.
 
Logos denotes an appeal to logic and reasoning. Logos is tricky because it relies on theories and abstract language. They include definitions, factual data, and statistics. Including learned comments by authoritative sources and Ethos driven opinions. Logos tries to give the best sources and reasoning. Appeals are taken as matter of facts and are useful in persuading others to believe a conclusion. 
 
 

 

:Flying:

 

Too bad these kinds of things aren't taught on a basic elementary level. I don't think humans were necessarily smarter in the ancient days. What's been handed down by them is our continued thoughts through the ages. Only thing is, anything really thoughtful and fulfilling is subjugated to extreme prejudice by any who hold high authority. For a reason! I think the value of Ethos has been taken over to shield these powers from the common masses. Inserting passive pathos against the masses using the logos to fool common sense. Turning knowledge into a commodity. Even simple trade knowledge is being suppressed....

 

Does this do any society well? 


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#75 Rufus Tullius

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 11:42 AM

Adages and Proverbs. 
 
An adage is a vivid expression of speech based on facts that is considered by many people to be a genuine truth. They're usually sayings that have been around for a long period of time. Often repeated over generations and sometimes can be considered as a proverb. Adages are usually universal, having been tested over different periods of time and still holding its truth within. The only real difference I can see is that a parable is more of a short story with a moral lesson at the end. Whereas an Adage is a short expression or saying of universal truth. Adages are great in advertising and scripting. It gives a certain awareness to facts and can be applied in situations to convey a deeper meaning. 
 
1646e351cf6e8200ef0f8f2306730f37.jpg
 
Parables use symbols and other imagery that are easily recognized. Taking complicated truths and telling it in such a way where it becomes communicative to an audience. They help to understand philosophical lessons and make them relatable in everyday life. 
 
wineskins-old-new.jpg

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#76 MrChips

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 11:56 AM

 

The art of argumentation can be used against those who don't appreciate it's forms and structure as an art for distraction.
 
Skillful argumentation is an antidote to productive communication.  It offers a way to eliminate bickering, anger, fear, and all the trash that prevents decent control of oneself. It's both an informal and formal method of debate leading to agreement by examining claims and justification by focusing on the interaction of argument, Itself!.
 
I'd like to think humanity has upgraded itself since Homer, Aristotle, and the countless others who began the art of conversation. Setting conditions of claims and evidence and shifting it all around with inference and warrants. The whole point of reasonable argument is to look for resolution.  This only works, of course, with reasonable people. Closed minds and using physical force can obviously kill any argument, anytime!

 

 

 

:Grin8:

 

Five star thread OP!

 

:hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:   :hangingfromastar:

 

 

Ethos, Pathos, and Logos

 
Rhetorical appeals and their uses:
 
Ethos refers to how trust worthy a person is. Ethos is used to appeal to a moral philosophy or reliable integrity. It attempts to signify credibility within the speaker.  It is effective as a strategy because it automatically inserts belief in the speakers credibility because of a higher educational or moral being. A doctor is good example. People hold a doctors power of reasoning in high regard. Same with a judge because a certain trust is automatically implied. It can used to challenge the reliability or moral stance in an argument. 
 
Pathos is another powerful device. They appeal to emotions. It's always loaded with vivid illustrations that trigger emotional buttons. The speaker wants the listener or reader to be persuaded by the emotional value this type of argument can generate. Packed with sympathy and empathy they dim the analytical processing of rational thought. The more people react to this type of rhetoric the more they become least likely to ask the big question(s). Like WHY? In many instances they're used in calls to action within a group or society.
 
Logos denotes an appeal to logic and reasoning. Logos is tricky because it relies on theories and abstract language. They include definitions, factual data, and statistics. Including learned comments by authoritative sources and Ethos driven opinions. Logos tries to give the best sources and reasoning. Appeals are taken as matter of facts and are useful in persuading others to believe a conclusion. 
 
 

 

:Flying:

 

 

 

Too bad these kinds of things aren't taught on a basic elementary level. I don't think humans were necessarily smarter in the ancient days. What's been handed down by them is our continued thoughts through the ages. Only thing is, anything really thoughtful and fulfilling is subjugated to extreme prejudice by any who hold high authority. For a reason! I think the value of Ethos has been taken over to shield these powers from the common masses. Inserting passive pathos against the masses using the logos to fool common sense. Turning knowledge into a commodity. Even simple trade knowledge is being suppressed....

 

Does this do any society well? 

 

 

Criticizing knowledge itself and denying the possibility of a universal truth makes knowledge dependent on the individual knower. This is an old concept meaning that your ideas are as good as mine and that there is no objective truth that is absolute for all men and women. With that in mind it became necessary to investigate thinking in a carefully framed theory of knowledge. Today we call this logic: a set of laws and a blueprint to work within the science of thought. 
 
Yes, knowledge is a commodity...
 
Common sense for the masses is based on consumerism. Using desire to tease out an emotional response. The tools to learn new things for the individual knower are there. But, they're obscured by thunderous clouds of wanton emotion. Raining torrential temptations down on the common mind to befuddle it with endless addictions that go nowhere...
 
Where is the soul in all of that? Besides, couldn't ethos, pathos, and logic be universal truths in their own right? That is if they were truly represented in their most altruistic form...
 
:Brain_Fart:
 
:chuckle:

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Good Morning!

 

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#77 Feathers

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 01:08 PM

Rhetoric is really effective when it's heard on the podium. All the mannerisms, inflections, and tonal structures add to its power to convince the crowd.

 

This site looks interesting for spoken examples of some of the greatest American rhetoric ever uttered...

 

American Rhetoric
 
Figures, definitions, and illustrations of rhetorical figures in sound
 
 

 


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#78 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 12:55 PM

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#79 status - Carpathia

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 03:40 PM

 

Hegelian Dialectic
 
The Hegelian Dialectic is a device used by governments and various actors to influence the public sentiment and cause a desired change in social values. 
 
In simple terms,
 
1. create a problem by artificial means.  
 
2. wait for a pre-determined response. 
 
3. use the response to propose a pre-determined solution.
 
7b341a4cd580b50e0078b455c4f312f7.jpg

 

 

“Dialectics” is a term used to describe a method of philosophical argument that involves some sort of contradictory process between opposing sides. In what is perhaps the most classic version of “dialectics”, the ancient Greek philosopher, Plato (see entry on Plato), for instance, presented his philosophical argument as a back-and-forth dialogue or debate, generally between the character of Socrates, on one side, and some person or group of people to whom Socrates was talking (his interlocutors), on the other. In the course of the dialogues, Socrates’ interlocutors propose definitions of philosophical concepts or express views that Socrates challenges or opposes. The back-and-forth debate between opposing sides produces a kind of linear progression or evolution in philosophical views or positions: as the dialogues go along, Socrates’ interlocutors change or refine their views in response to Socrates’ challenges and come to adopt more sophisticated views. The back-and-forth dialectic between Socrates and his interlocutors thus becomes Plato’s way of arguing against the earlier, less sophisticated views or positions and for the more sophisticated ones later.
 
“Hegel’s dialectics” refers to the particular dialectical method of argument employed by the 19th Century German philosopher, G.W.F. Hegel (see entry on Hegel), which, like other “dialectical” methods, relies on a contradictory process between opposing sides. Whereas Plato’s “opposing sides” were people (Socrates and his interlocutors), however, what the “opposing sides” are in Hegel’s work depends on the subject matter he discusses. In his work on logic, for instance, the “opposing sides” are different definitions of logical concepts that are opposed to one another. In the Phenomenology of Spirit, which presents Hegel’s epistemology or philosophy of knowledge, the “opposing sides” are different definitions of consciousness and of the object that consciousness is aware of or claims to know. As in Plato’s dialogues, a contradictory process between “opposing sides” in Hegel’s dialectics leads to a linear evolution or development from less sophisticated definitions or views to more sophisticated ones later. The dialectical process thus constitutes Hegel’s method for arguing against the earlier, less sophisticated definitions or views and for the more sophisticated ones later. Hegel regarded this dialectical method or “speculative mode of cognition” (PR §10) as the hallmark of his philosophy, and used the same method in the Phenomenology of Spirit [PhG], as well as in all of the mature works he published later—the entire Encyclopaedia of Philosophical Sciences (including, as its first part, the “Lesser Logic” or the Encyclopaedia Logic [EL]), the Science of Logic [SL], and the Philosophy of Right [PR].
 
Note that, although Hegel acknowledged that his dialectical method was part of a philosophical tradition stretching back to Plato, he criticized Plato’s version of dialectics. He argued that Plato’s dialectics deals only with limited philosophical claims and is unable to get beyond skepticism or nothingness (SL-M 55–6; SL-dG 34–5; PR, Remark to §31). According to the logic of a traditional reductio ad absurdum argument, if the premises of an argument lead to a contradiction, we must conclude that the premises are false—which leaves us with no premises or with nothing. We must then wait around for new premises to spring up arbitrarily from somewhere else, and then see whether those new premises put us back into nothingness or emptiness once again, if they, too, lead to a contradiction. Because Hegel believed that reason necessarily generates contradictions, as we will see, he thought new premises will indeed produce further contradictions. As he puts the argument, then,
 
the scepticism that ends up with the bare abstraction of nothingness or emptiness cannot get any further from there, but must wait to see whether something new comes along and what it is, in order to throw it too into the same empty abyss.
 

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#80 Rufus Tullius

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 03:11 PM

 

Criticizing knowledge itself and denying the possibility of a universal truth makes knowledge dependent on the individual knower. This is an old concept meaning that your ideas are as good as mine and that there is no objective truth that is absolute for all men and women. With that in mind it became necessary to investigate thinking in a carefully framed theory of knowledge. Today we call this logic: a set of laws and a blueprint to work within the science of thought. 
 
Yes, knowledge is a commodity...
 
Common sense for the masses is based on consumerism. Using desire to tease out an emotional response. The tools to learn new things for the individual knower are there. But, they're obscured by thunderous clouds of wanton emotion. Raining torrential temptations down on the common mind to befuddle it with endless addictions that go nowhere...
 
Where is the soul in all of that? Besides, couldn't ethos, pathos, and logic be universal truths in their own right? That is if they were truly represented in their most altruistic form...
 
:Brain_Fart:
 
:chuckle:

 

 

:happy:

 

When all else fails humor is the best medicine.

 

1389ecf555292b4b3bcc78bbbb3e2b0d--cute-f


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