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Incarceration and Private Prison Firms

chicken coup fearful things

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#1 Riddikulus

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 10:35 AM

‘Modern Day Slave Auction’ Captured On Film – Government Caught Selling People

Shocking hidden camera footage appears to show what can only be described as a modern day slave auction.

The video shows an auctioneer selling off the Bill Clayton Detention Center in Littlefield, Texas. Many of those housed in this center are immigrants who were caught trying to enter the U.S. illegally.

Is this a case of modern day slavery?  

Private Prisons Auction Off Inmates

 


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#2 Riddikulus

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 10:53 AM

Private prisons such as the CCA (Corrections Corporation of America) own over 200 facilities in the nation and makes a profit close to 5 billion dollars per year on inmates. They rely on anti-immigrant laws like Arizona's SB1070 and copycat laws across the nation for fresh inmates and continual profit.

 

Private Prisons sell people like products • Immigrants for Sale

 

 

These private prison companies are going to need product. Meaning, they'll lobby for more codes and policies to fit within our system of 'law' to fill there own pocketbooks with real live human robots to serve their wicked machinations. Watch out all you jay-walkers, you're next!

 


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#3 status - Guest

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 12:41 PM

Stuff They Don't Want You to Know - Prisons and Profit
 

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#4 Riddikulus

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 02:11 PM

 

My own opinion?  I don't think it's a Jewish thing at all!  I think the TPTB don't care about any religion or institution other than their own.  And they don't share!


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#5 Riddikulus

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 06:49 PM

"In the nineteenth century, Texas leased its penitentiary (which survives today as the Huntsville "Walls" unit) to private contractors. For a few dollars per month per convict, the contractors were allowed to sublease their charges to farmers, tanners, and other businessmen. It was not long before the inmates began to appear in poor clothing and without shoes. Worked mercilessly, most convicts died within seven years of their incarceration. Escapes and escape attempts were frequent. Conditions were so horrid that some inmates were driven to suicide while other maimed themselves to get out of work or as a pathetic form of protest."
- John DiIulio, Jr. The Duty to Govern, 1990

 

American Gulag: A Lot More Than License Plates
http://www.huffingto..._b_1415459.html

 

2012-04-19-ScreenShot20120419at10.20.21A


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#6 Riddikulus

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 06:51 PM

Manufacturing Pilots for the Repatriation of Products Under the New FPI Authority
http://www.unicor.go...tionPilots.aspx

In support of the Federal Bureau of Prisons’ reentry efforts, Federal Prison Industries, Inc. (FPI) has been granted the authority under Section 221 of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2102, codified at 18 U.S.C. 1761(d) authorizes FPI to manufacture, produce, mine or assemble goods, wares or merchandise that is currently, or would otherwise be manufactured, produced, mined or assembled outside of the United States.


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#7 Riddikulus

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 06:58 PM

Mexican officials promoting prison factories to U.S. firms

Prison officials in Mexico's northern states are pointing to inmate workshops as a way to stem the loss of business as foreign-owned assembly plants abandon the border zone in search of cheaper labor in Asia. Convicts already do work for Mexican companies.

But prison labor is strongly criticized around the globe on the grounds it undercuts unions, steals jobs from law-abiding workers and poses risks of human rights abuses. Many countries, like the United States, bar imports of products made by prisoners.

 

 


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#8 Riddikulus

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 02:53 PM

Private Prisons Threaten To Sue States Unless They Get More Inmates For Free Labor

private-prisons.png

Freedom is apparently bad for business. That’s the message from the private prison industry which is threatening to sue states if they don’t start locking more people up.


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#9 status - Guest

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 03:00 PM

And just this week, Arizona has done away with private prison corporations over riots that have ocurred.
   
    GOVERNOR DOUG DUCEY SEVERS PRIVATE PRISON CONTRACT FOLLOWING RIOTS

 

    Governor Doug Ducey fired the company that manages a private prison near Kingman, saying the group did not “promptly and effectively” quell a three-day riot in July that injured 16 people.

 

    “Our action should send a loud warning shot to all prison operators,” Ducey said. “Fail in your job, we will hold you accountable. Risk public safety, we will end your relationship with Arizona.”

 

    Ducey made the announcement Wednesday after the Arizona Department of Corrections released the results of an investigation into the Management and Training Corporation’s handling of the incident.

 

 

    Arizona cuts ties with private-prison operator over Kingman riot

 


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#10 Jesse Jimmie

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 11:28 AM

http://www.blacklist.../38/38/Y/M.html

The private prison industry has rapidly expanded in recent decades as the proportion of incarcerated people quadrupled under the failed "tough on crime" and drug war policies of the 1980s and 1990s, according to the report. Lawmakers are beginning to roll back policies such as mandatory minimum sentencing that have given the United States the highest incarceration rate in the world. However, private prison companies aren't going anywhere: They continue to spend millions of dollars on campaign donations and lobbying efforts to influence criminal legal policy and ensure that their profits continue to grow. - See more at: http://www.occupy.co...h.D87F6z00.dpuf

Source:  http://www.occupy.co...ish-conferences

 


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To Cluck or not to Cluck, that is the question...




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