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Chemical Waste Spilling from Harvey's Wake

infrastructure politics hurricane chemical waste

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#1 Digger

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 12:43 PM

New dangers lurk in Harvey’s wake
 
The water was leaving, at last. But, across Southeast Texas on Thursday, new dangers kept appearing in Hurricane Harvey’s wake.
 
Above, Environmental Protection Agency planes sniffed for toxic-chemical releases. Below, there was floodwater that authorities warned could contain pollutants and pathogens. In between, there were authorities and people trying to find order and supplies in a landscape totally changed by the massive storm.
 
 
Harvey pounded the nation's chemical epicenter. What's in the foul-smelling floodwater left behind?
 
Broken tanks, factory fires and ruptured pipes are thought to have released a cocktail of toxic chemicals into the waters. Explosions that released thick black smoke were reported at the Arkema Inc. chemical plant, where floods knocked out the electricity, leaving the facility outside Houston without refrigeration needed to protect volatile chemicals.
 
Exhaustive investigations by the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Academy of Engineering after Hurricane Katrina, in which floodwaters languished in New Orleans for about six weeks, showed that toxic concentrations and the resulting exposures were too low to cause significant long-term health problems.
 
That festering flood caused a stench for weeks that left soldiers gagging for air as they flew helicopters 2,000 feet over the city. The Army Corps of Engineers had to pump the water out of New Orleans, much of which lies below sea level.
 
The situation is far different in Houston, where the floodwaters are receding much faster.
 
But because Houston is far more industrialized, Harvey could have a much larger potential for leaving a toxic trail.
 
Texas regulators urged caution. “Floodwaters may contain many hazards, including infectious organisms, intestinal bacteria, and other disease agents,” the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality said in a statement. “Precautions should be taken by anyone involved in cleanup activities or any others who may be exposed to floodwaters.”
 

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 01:10 PM

This is a perfect opportunity for Trump to get on the infrastructure bandwagon in a big way. Harvey can spark a dialog to build up all the public works into something great again.
 

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#3 Digger

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 01:14 PM

They're all playing down the toxic theme. It's only an irritant. Officially. 


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#4 status - Guest

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 06:01 PM

Nothing toxic? I wonder how filthy all the waterways were before the hurricane. Especially with all the refineries around. Now it's spreading throughout the region...


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#5 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 06:02 PM

 

This is a perfect opportunity for Trump to get on the infrastructure bandwagon in a big way. Harvey can spark a dialog to build up all the public works into something great again.

 

 

The chemical and oil industries should be made to foot a large part of that bill. Clean it up. Upgrade all the engineering on the waterworks. Clean up the flow of energy that courses through the nation. If not by upgrade then by redesign; which means destruction first...


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#6 Feathers

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 06:44 PM

SNAPSHOTS OF PUBLIC SANITATION

 

http://forum.chicken...lic-sanitation/


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Posted 04 September 2017 - 08:04 PM

The chemical and oil industries should be made to foot a large part of that bill. Clean it up. Upgrade all the engineering on the waterworks. Clean up the flow of energy that courses through the nation. If not by upgrade then by redesign; which means destruction first...

 

It justifies the extra damage caused by their machinations. The damage is severe in the long run...


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#8 Riddikulus

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 12:47 PM

The chemical and oil industries should be made to foot a large part of that bill. Clean it up. Upgrade all the engineering on the waterworks. Clean up the flow of energy that courses through the nation. If not by upgrade then by redesign; which means destruction first...

 

:hangingfromastar:  :hangingfromastar:  :hangingfromastar:  :hangingfromastar:  :hangingfromastar:

 

That's always concerning. Lots of rivers in south are filthy. No liability for those who pollute it. I've heard in my own state that a state representative has put forth a bill to start a clean-up. Which is good.

 

Only, I'm wondering where the money is going to come from....

 

Do I really need to ask that question?

 

:funny-chicken-smiley-emoticon:


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#9 status - Guest

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 05:50 PM

Brain eating amoeba? Through the nose? Right into the brain...


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#10 status - xiaojun

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 10:32 AM

Large corporations throw spam in the rivers and oceans all the time


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