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Incredible Archaeological Discoveries - Merged

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#11 Digger

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 02:13 PM

Scientists and archaeologists are making new, incredible discoveries all the time about the history of Earth’s civilizations. Here are some of the most important--and the most bizarre--findings.
 
 
The Copper Scrolls
 
Between 1946-1956 the Dead Sea Scrolls, a collection of 981 texts in the caves of Qumran. The copper scroll, in particular, is said to describe copious amounts of gold and silver–yet no one knows where it may be. There is some confusion about the date of the scroll, but multiple archaeologists agree on around 70 CE. It’s pretty fascinating that there might be a lost treasure hidden in the world.
 
copper-scroll.jpg
 
 
Piles of hands
 
While excavating a 3,600-year-old palace in the once-great city of Avaris, Egypt, a team of archaeologists (after, presumably, fending off no fewer than three vengeful mummies and losing half their team to flesh-hungry scarabs) unearthed four pits. Now, we've already established in previous articles that ancient pits are often wells of unspeakable stuff best left to fade into history with their abominations unmined, but luckily (for the purposes of this article), the researchers decided to keep right on a-diggin' anyway.
 
"What's in the pits?" you're probably saying right now, in your best angsty Brad Pitt impression. And that's somewhat appropriate, because it's hands. No bodies -- just a bunch of dismembered hands.
 
These ancient hand recycling bins were found in the palace of King Khayan of the Hyksos, a West Asian people who once ruled over part of Northern Egypt. While two of the pits were located in an outer portion of the palace, the other two were right smack dab outside the throne room, indicating some ceremonial importance. According to Manfred Bietak, the leader of the excavations, "Most of the hands are quite large and some of them are very large," further signifying that they were all taken from adult males, and possibly that ancient Egypt was plagued by giants. Also, they're all righties, because even way back then no one wanted anything to do with the freak devil-hand.
 
328356_v1.jpg
 
 
Ancient animal traps
 
Low stone walls crisscrossing the deserts of Israel, Egypt and Jordan have puzzled archaeologists since their discovery by pilots in the early 20th century.
 
The chain of lines some up to 40 miles (64 kilometers) long and nicknamed "kites" by scientists for their appearance from the air date to 300 B.C., but were abandoned long ago.
 
The mystery might be somewhat clearer thanks to a recent study claiming that the purpose of the kites was to funnel wild animals toward a small pit, where they could easily be killed in large numbers. This efficient system suggests that local hunters knew more about the behavior of local fauna than previously thought.
 
kites.jpg
 
 
Ancient Scrolls Reveal That Budget Cuts, Not Fire, Destroyed The Library of Alexandria
 
The Royal Library of Alexandria was one of the largest scholarly institutions ever built, containing thousands of scrolls and texts from the greatest thinkers of ancient times. However, its quick disappearance from history has led many to believe that it was destroyed in a fire, possibly at the orders of Julius Caesar when he attacked Egypt. Recent evidence uncovered by Luciano Canfora, in the form of scrolls written by people working in the library, reveal that it was actually brought down due to budget cuts from the government rather than a dramatic event. Texts gradually fell apart or were given to other institutions, and what was left of the Library's collection was likely destroyed in 642.
 
 
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Posted 04 September 2017 - 02:40 PM

Piles of hands? I heard a story about that involving Julius Caesar. After a large battle he made a whole tribe an example by cutting off the hands of all the military age men. Then dispersed them throughout the land to show the rest what happens to those who defy Rome. Didn't even cash them in as slaves. Extreme and violent theatre but very effective.


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#13 Digger

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 03:09 PM

Piles of hands? I heard a story about that involving Julius Caesar. After a large battle he made a whole tribe an example by cutting off the hands of all the military age men. Then dispersed them throughout the land to show the rest what happens to those who defy Rome. Didn't even cash them in as slaves. Extreme and violent theatre but very effective.

 

Yes. It is effective. I thought the animal traps were interesting.


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#14 Digger

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 03:31 PM

I've done some threads on this kind of thing before...

 

Super henge found near Stonehenge
 
 
144218983077.jpg
 
 

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#15 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 05:44 PM

Yes. It is effective. I thought the animal traps were interesting.

 

Reminds me of the old forest of the king. Old feudal attitudes towards law decreed everything was 'owned' by the king or the crown. He and his party would go into the forest reserves and hunt in this way. Trapping herds has a history in North America too. A common technique for any tribe of hunters to employ. 


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Posted 05 September 2017 - 10:33 PM

Piles of hands? I heard a story about that involving Julius Caesar. After a large battle he made a whole tribe an example by cutting off the hands of all the military age men. Then dispersed them throughout the land to show the rest what happens to those who defy Rome. Didn't even cash them in as slaves. Extreme and violent theatre but very effective.

 

Like these?

 

mount-owen-moa.jpg

 

:chuckle:


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#17 Feathers

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 11:54 PM

 

Taste like chicken!

 

:Grin9:


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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:12 AM

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#19 Digger

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 02:46 PM

A 3,000 Year Old, Totally Decked-Out Golden Bong
 
The Scythians were kind of like real-life Dothraki, partying their way across Eurasia thousands of years ago, leaving nothing but massive grave mounds behind. When archaeologists were asked to dig up one such mound to make way for some power lines, they didn't expect to find much inside, since it had clearly been pillaged a time or two in the intervening millennia. However, one chamber still contained golden cups, rings, bracelets ... and a couple of bongs. And they were totally sweet.
 
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Sure, that doesn't look much like the contents of your roommate's closet, but scientists not only confirmed that the residue found inside those big vessels was opium and cannabis, but that both drugs were smoked at the same time. Yeah, the Scythians did not fuck around. Apparently, decorating everything like a death metal album cover is a pothead tradition as old as time. One of the bongs is carved with scenes of various mythological creatures ripping each other apart, including "a stag in a bleak landscape that [archaeologist] Belinski thinks represents the Scythian underworld." In other words, actual hell.
 
 
Archaeologists Excavate Possible Home of Mary Magdalene and Synagogue Where Jesus May Have Preached
 
A Catholic priest and archaeologists in Israel are excavating an ancient synagogue and a site that may have been the home of Mary Magdalene, who has been called Jesus' most beloved disciple. Archaeologists say Jesus could have preached in the temple as he is said in the Gospels to have preached at synagogues in the Galilee and no other synagogue from his lifetime has been found. 
 
Six years ago Juan Solana, a Catholic priest, bought some property in the ancient town of Magdala and was required to do exploratory excavations under Israeli law. By chance he found the ruins of a 1st century AD synagogue.
 
Magdala-Stone.jpg
 
“Historians believe Jesus may have once walked the cobbled streets,” says a CNN story that was published on WDAM.com “This may have been home to one of the most important figures of the Bible, Mary Magdalene. The first recorded witness of the resurrection. 'This is a holy site. I am sure of that,' said Father Juan Solana.” 
 
Solana bought the land in Magdala to build a Christian retreat. The synagogue dates to the first century AD. The New Testament says Jesus preached in synagogues in the Galilee, and this is the only one that dates to Jesus' lifetime that has been excavated in the area.
 
The synagogue is ornate with frescoes and mosaic floors. It has an altar, called a bimah in Hebrew, in the center. People call this the Magdala stone. It has on it a rare menorah carved into the stone
 
 
Melting glaciers in northern Italy reveal corpses of WW1 soldiers
 
The glaciers of the Italian Alps are slowly melting to reveal horrors from the Great War, preserved for nearly a century 
 
In the decades that followed the armistice, the world warmed up and the glaciers began to retreat, revealing the debris of the White War. The material that, beginning in the 1990s, began to flood out of the mountains was remarkably well preserved. It included a love letter, addressed to Maria and never sent, and an ode to a louse, ‘friend of my long days’, scribbled on a page of an Austrian soldier’s diary. 
 
The bodies, when they came, were often mummified. The two soldiers interred last September were blond, blue-eyed Austrians aged 17 and 18 years old, who died on the Presena glacier and were buried by their comrades, top-to-toe, in a crevasse. Both had bulletholes in their skulls. One still had a spoon tucked into his puttees — common practice among soldiers who travelled from trench to trench and ate out of communal pots. When Franco Nicolis of the Archaeological Heritage Office in the provincial capital, Trento, saw them, he says, his first thought was for their mothers. ‘They feel contemporary. They come out of the ice just as they went in,’ he says. In all likelihood the soldiers’ mothers never discovered their sons’ fate. 
 
WHITEWARgun_2787478c.jpg
 
Peio’s war museum fills out the picture. Inside its display cases are primitive-looking surgical instruments of the kind Kristof might have used, rosaries, porcelain pipes that resemble small saxophones, decorated in the Tyrolian style, and ‘trench art’ carved out of fragments of shells or shell casings. In the hungry period following the armistice, the villagers roamed the mountains looking to salvage material they could reuse or sell. Some pieces they kept as souvenirs, donating them to the museum when it opened 10 years ago. ‘They consider the museum their collective property,’ Dalpez says. ‘They’re proud of it.’
 
More than 80 soldiers who fell in the White War have come to light in recent decades. 
 
whitewar_museum__2787509c.jpg
 

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#20 Riddikulus

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 01:05 PM

The oldest 'water pipes' known to man:

 

2,400-year-old solid gold bongs used by tribal chiefs in ceremonies to smoke cannabis and opium have been dug up in Russia by archaeologists who were clearing out an ancient burial mound before construction workers installed power lines. Historians believe that the devices belonged to the Scythians, a nomadic warrior race who existed in Europe and Asia between the 9th century BC and the 4th century AD.
 

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