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#1 chickensomething

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 06:03 PM

For some reason, there are some serious discrepancies and omissions from Wikipedia (Go Figure) that are more than disturbing. We all take for granted there some guy or people in a room or building somewhere making sure the Internet time clock is absolutely precise. Many people do not realize how important and ultimately catastrophic a minor glitch in this "virtual clock" would cause on a global scale literally in a millisecond. You would think various news organizations would be all over this information, not to mention governments taking extreme measures to make sure the following does not happen.

 

Take this snippet from the Harvard Business Review article, for example:

 

Open-source code resides everywhere. If you’ve hired a software developer, their work most likely contained code from the open-source community. The same goes for software programs. Let me take my favorite example, the Network Time Protocol, or NTP. Invented by David Mills of the University of Delaware, it is the protocol that has been keeping time on the internet for over 30 years. This is important because all computer systems require reliable time — even more so if they communicate with one another. This is how stock exchanges timestamp trade. In a world of high-frequency trading, imagine if there was no agreement as to what that time was. Chaos would reign.

You might think that time is a pretty stable thing. But it’s not. What we call “time” changes over time. Different countries set their clocks back or move them ahead, and every so often we have a leap second event that requires everyone to recognize an extra second at the same time. To add to that, time must be kept down to the millisecond, which means the server that houses time has to operate very precisely.

Though it doesn’t mention Network Time Foundation by name, this perfectly describes the need for the foundation and what it does. Although the Average Joe and Jane rely on accurate time, they are not the people ensuring it is so. Someone has to keep the time. It’s a lot of work. Far too much work for one man, yes? But…

Now for the scary part. What if I told you that the entire NTP relies on the sole effort of a 61-year-old who has pretty much volunteered his own time for the last 30 years? His name is Harlan Stenn, he lives in Oregon, in the United States, and he is so unknown that he does not even appear on the NTP Wikipedia page.

While this isn’t completely accurate (other volunteers also contribute to the code and the project’s online infrastructure), it drives home the point. Network Time Foundation is funding NTP, but the President of the foundation – the main programmer of NTP – doesn’t even appear on the Wikipedia page! How are we supposed to bring in the level of funding necessary to support these vital projects if no one knows we exist?

 

Once upon a time, Network Time Foundation had a Wikipedia entry (It is no longer spoken or found on Wikipedia), but it was removed by Wikipedia moderators. We knew the importance of a Wikipedia entry, but we didn’t know it is a no-no to write the entry ourselves. Someone not affiliated with Network Time Foundation would need to write the Wikipedia entry on our behalf. Maybe that person is you?

 

Now imagine this monumental project receiving no funding or attention whatsoever. Either somebody has gone insane or there is a particular reason for this. You be the judge and do some research as every second counts, literally! 

 


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#2 status - Guest

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 06:24 PM

No wonder it's invisible.

 

This just allows the big boys in the money exchanges to live on their own time and do things in a different timeline.

 

Not only a different set of laws but a different set of time values. This would allow for trading and profit over and above the common markets.

 

Without beeing scene...


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#3 status - Smooth Chips

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 06:43 PM

It's all about the flow of capital and impeding it.
 
Timestamps determine everything in trading.
 
If London is off by 1 or 2 seconds or less 1 millisecond, a trade could go through that was injected or spoofed
 
As they have IP spoofing technology.
 
That's how the hackers operate.
 
Thus IPv6 but they have that cracked too.
 

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#4 Feathers

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 06:47 PM

I think it will end in the World governments saying we all need a unique mark to do anything to stop hackers.


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#5 chickensomething

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 06:51 PM

Time does indeed heal all wounds. In this case, it opens them up wide. The reliance of the human race on computers will be our downfall. You would think the powers that be would have an old-time redundancy plan just in case all the power goes out. Much like the Pony express but much more refined. This is a no-brainer really but the World is so flat and connected any circular thinking becomes against the machine. Seen as a threat when in fact, it's just a rational precaution. 


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#6 chickensomething

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 06:59 PM

This articles purpose is real and to hopefully might inspire somebody with the time and resources to do something about it.

 

Open-source code is embedded throughout all software. And since it interacts with other code and is constantly changing, it is not a set-it-and-forget-it deal. No software is static.
 
Last year we saw the consequences from this when a 28-year-old developer briefly “broke“ the internet because he deleted open-source code that he had made available. The drama occurred because the developer’s program shared a name with Kik, the popular Canadian messaging app, and there was a trademark dispute. The rest of the story is complicated but has an important takeaway: Our digital infrastructure is very fragile.
 
There are people so important to maintaining code that the internet would break if they were hit by a bus. (Computer security folks literally call this the “bus factor.”) These people are well-meaning but tired and underfunded. And I haven’t even gotten to the fact that hard-to-maintain code is precisely where security vulnerabilities reside (just ask Ukraine).
 
All this makes Y2K look like a picnic, especially since the magnitude of these issues is unknown. Individual companies have no idea how vulnerable they might be. And it may be slow-moving — systems slowly being corrupted without causing crashes that are visible. Finally, since open-source platforms have been built by a community that has relished its independence, the problems won’t be easy to fix using traditional commercial or governmental approaches.
 
There are pioneers who are working on the problem. Open Collective is providing resources to aggregate the needs of groups of open-source projects to assist in the financing, resourcing, and maintenance. Another organization, libraries.io, is doing a heroic job of indexing projects, including much-needed documentation and a map of relationships between projects. But none of these have support from the businesses most vulnerable to the issues.
 
When Y2K emerged, publicly listed companies were told to catalog their vulnerabilities and plans. The time has come again for markets (and perhaps regulators) to demand similar audits as a first step toward working out the magnitude of the problem. And maybe — just maybe — those corporations will find a way to support the infrastructure they are depending on, rather than taking it blindly as some unacknowledged gift. Every day is now Y2K.

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#7 status - Wurm

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 02:24 PM

Most of the time clock drifts and time-stamp discrepancies are related to illegal activities. It's a massive network using atomic-clock monitoring throughout the whole system. All synchronized with one time source. It uses a wide variety of software to prove accuracy across the board. Logging every event and analyzing the whole for drifting. Some systems have low cost battery base quartz crystal clocks. These tend to lag behind the time protocol. Plus, there's the satellite GPS systems. These are vulnerable to signal disruptions over the wireless. Leaving wormholes in time for secret and active travel across the framework.


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#8 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 02:48 PM

 

Most of the time clock drifts and time-stamp discrepancies are related to illegal activities. It's a massive network using atomic-clock monitoring throughout the whole system. All synchronized with one time source. It uses a wide variety of software to prove accuracy across the board. Logging every event and analyzing the whole for drifting. Some systems have low cost battery base quartz crystal clocks. These tend to lag behind the time protocol. Plus, there's the satellite GPS systems. These are vulnerable to signal disruptions over the wireless. Leaving wormholes in time for secret and active travel across the framework.

 

White space is another way to transmit data. Basically, they're just radio links. White-space technology allows multiple services to share the same radio bands by hopping between frequencies. It's old technology but it's free so they don't want to bring it out. Just like radio. It's super fast bandwidth with no limits essentially.
 

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#9 Feathers

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 02:55 PM

The World Clock — Worldwide

 

Current Local Times Around the World

 

https://www.timeandd...com/worldclock/

 

The Time Zone Converter

 

http://www.thetimezoneconverter.com/

 

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#10 status - Guest

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 03:10 PM

Time does indeed heal all wounds. In this case, it opens them up wide. The reliance of the human race on computers will be our downfall. You would think the powers that be would have an old-time redundancy plan just in case all the power goes out. Much like the Pony express but much more refined. This is a no-brainer really but the World is so flat and connected any circular thinking becomes against the machine. Seen as a threat when in fact, it's just a rational precaution. 

 


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