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Would You Like a Reading?


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#21 Rufus Tullius

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 12:16 PM

 
Frank-Underwood-Saying-Welcom-Back-House
 
:chuckle:
 

Metafiction - What does it mean?

The prefix "meta" means something about something. In this case 'about' fiction. It does more though: it goes beyond the realm of fancies and fiction. In the classic days of Aristotle it was thought that meta should come after or later. I.E. First teaching physics and then moving on to metaphysics. Now that seems logical to me...

Metafiction is fiction about fiction. It calls attention to its own devices and makes no attempt to be realistic. It is a writing style used to reflect the self conscious use of language. It's storytelling that talks about itself in strange ways.

If an author or narrator of the work decides to jump around and dance in the story, that would be metafiction.

If a book acknowledges itself as a book, that too, is metafiction.

It reflects on the psychology of reading and talks about us and about self reflexivity.

Metafiction helps people to look at fiction and ask questions about our own interpretations of how we feel about an it.

Metafiction uses surreal and unrealistic devices to question the reader.

Metafiction 'talk's to the 'you' in all of us. Possibly even questioning things that we don't even know exist.

Do you think there are terms such as metamusic or metapainting? Or is this only a concept possible in writing only? 

 

 For more on Metafiction and it's social implications click this link

 
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#22 Feathers

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 12:29 PM

MetaPainting?

 

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:falling_leaves3:


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#23 Rufus Tullius

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 12:48 PM

 

:rofl:

 

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#24 Feathers

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 01:01 PM

:funny-chicken-dancing:

 

 

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#25 Rufus Tullius

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 04:32 PM

Literary Adaptions
 
How come so many movies are never as good as the book? 
How would you re-read a book to write an adaption for the screen?
Is it the casting of character, would you use a different setting, or change character differences to suit a particular angle? 
How would you change the dialog? If at all?
How about the Narrator? Is he important? 
 
All the above and more...
 
First, more questions:
 
:chuckle:
 
Can a film get inside a persons head like a book can?  
Which parts of a book make the best candidates to transfer onto film?
What about the dialog?
How about the Plot
Are the events portrayed in the same order?
Do the characters meet up to your preconceived image?
What scenes are more important than others?
What should be revised, distorted, or when should liberties be taken?
Are narration voice overs a good device for a movie to use?
Does this downgrade a movie into an un-adulterated novel?
 
Film relies on lighting, sound, camera placement, movement from characters and lots of visual action. Literature is a completely verbal medium. It relies on language alone.
 
The invention of the movies changed how literary styles were presented to the new 'modern' public. Movies got all the spectacle: explosions, car chases, and lots of visual excitement. No dialog was needed. Not in the beginning. This is important to consider. Whereas books got the psychology, consciousness, and the inner life reflections a complete story can give. Sometimes, an adaption from a book can be more effective than a faithful rendition.
 
Lastly, I'll close this post with a few more questions to ask yourself:
 
What are some of your favorite book to movie adaptations?
How often are you disappointed by those movies? 
Do you read the book first then see the movie? 
Do your own depictions of character, story, and plot change when you see the movie version?
 
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#26 Rufus Tullius

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 12:05 PM

Shall we play with reality today? :chuckle:
 
Verisimilitude
 
What is realism and reality? Some people just want to be entertained and don't care about the realism of a novel, movie, or play. For others it can be a major problem: If it isn't real then it ain't worth reading or seeing. They prefer the non-fiction type of stuff. A good book or movie can be realistic in one sense and unrealistic in another. It just means we have to break apart what realism really is. 
 
What is real inside of a book or a television screen? Do the descriptions, settings and characters offer vivid realism to the eye? For some yes, others no. I suppose it depends on the perspective of the individual reader. Maybe it's not so much about providing an image of the outside world but maybe it's about mapping out a more private type of garden; an interior landscape for others to see into. 
 
Let's look at realism a bit more closely. There are different kinds of realism to consider. How do we label what's real or unreal? In C. S. Lewis' - An Experiment in Criticism, he mentions two types of realism to look for: 
 
Realism of presentation - How are things presented to the reader. Using descriptions that give feeling to our senses. Is the un-realistic aspect (such as something you would find in a SCI-FY or Fantasy novel) described with powerful descriptions that you practically believe their existence? Does the mood develop and establish a pace? It does matter how a story is presented because it shows how easy it is to play with reality. Is the tone and timber agreeable to the ear?
 
Realism of content - Content described through plotting. It deals with hypothetical probabilities. Sometimes those can get out of hand leaving the reader to put down the book as unrealistic. The setting can be one identifiable aspect. Isolating the theme can help identify the realism involved.
 
This post will add two more forms of realism to consider:
 
Psychological realism - This ties in with how characters are developed or treated. It draws out the feelings from past experiences, sketching out the personality from childhood on to the present. It tells the characters internal feelings and how conflict is dealt with. 
 
Moral realism - Also ties in with character development. What is the character motivated by? Selfishness? If so, then fear is a major factor. Moral realism asks the reader to go beyond using snap judgments to form opinions. I guess Yoda really did know what the fuck he was talking about.
 
Considering how many angles a 'reality' can told in maybe realism is more like an ideal than a reality. The eye of the beholder I guess...only, in todays reality it seems the big eye is a bunch of little screens telling everyone the same stories over and over again with different presentations. And our little eyes seem to be reading a dazzled 'reality' being depicted from this 'beholder' we all stare at so much.
 
That eye reminds me of a giant insect 
 
horsefly_2111421i.jpg
 
Unreal? I'll let the reader decide...
 
:Idea1:
 
:Flying:

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#27 Feathers

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 12:24 PM

:Good_Post:

 

Don't forget about the spiders.

 

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:chuckle:


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#28 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 04:37 PM

Nice post on Verisimilitude.
 
I recently read a novel and I think it offers realism in all four of the categories!
 
Whether or not the future presented is real or not? That remains to be seen...
 
Here's a great article written about it touching on many of the posts you already pointed out in this thread. 
 
Kim Stanley Robinson’s Latest Novel Imagines Life in an Underwater New York
 
 
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#29 status - Shaking the Spear

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 02:41 PM

A long time ago, in a time not too far away, battle lines were drawn between the bards and gleeman. The bards, the true inheritors of the spirit and traditions of the muses, were excommunicated from the halls of the mighty courts of men. They were banished across the seven seas to live in poverty and affliction while the wily gleeman dazzled the cathedrals and palaces with their witty false arts and wedded their wily and woolly weaves with the written word of the prophets.
 
Give me a rhythm...
 
daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM. 
 
"If music be the food you love, play on."
 
:chuckle:
 
Put little dots above the stress points if'n it'll help ya!
 
Lots and lots of rhythm patterns in poetry. But all that Iambic pentameter can get a bit boring after awhile. So a lot of stress points are shifted round and about and out of order making it easier to insert a new dance craze. Great for drawing in the rubes.
 
That's a gleeman for you. They can bring in the crowds and give a great show. But, while the audience is watching the fleas play on the stage the gleeman and his sidekick are lifting a few items from your pockets without you even seeing.
 
 
 
 

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#30 Rufus Tullius

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 10:15 AM

Interpretations, evaluations, and bias
 
Too many questions involving who's right and who's wrong. There are more interesting questions to ask. Reading slowly often helps in mitigating some of the bias' involved. At least slow enough to see the presence of its ever present sense lurking in the shadows.

Is there a conflict between a books explicit meaning verses any unacknowledged implications or sub-texts a piece may contain?
What assumptions might lie behind any interpretation?
How can an artful reader bring their own bias' and assumptions out into the open?
What kind of reader do you want to be?

Often, when searching for interpretations, one stumbles upon facts that can change the whole outlook of an evaluation or analysis. What do you do with a new fact when it goes against a bigger group of facts already stating an explanation? Do you let your bias' get in the way and throw it in the garbage heap? Do you try to burn a truth out of existence before anyone else can see it?

Interpretation is defined as an explanation. The meaning must not be specifically obvious. It involves unlocking a secret or solving a mystery. Interpretation also involves discovering the subtext in the descriptions. Do you sense a character keeping something from the reader? Do you as the reader find the places that are revealing in the subtext?

Interpretation is designed to take an artful reader past what is obvious and should not be surprised when different interpretations come into conflict. For an Artful Reader disagreement is not a sign to indicate something may be wrong. It is an indication that you may be actually getting somewhere.

That means taking time for a little self discovery.
 

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