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Halloween Tricks and Treats

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#21 Feathers

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 07:33 PM

Cheap party treat ideas:

 

bc4ffb6bf1e15afe70cd005997bb0d17--hallow

 

 

 

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#22 status - Guest

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 01:20 PM

It wasn't too long ago when many children would come to my door on Halloween. 50 years and more ago all the kids from all around would be out in groups causing mischief and having a good time. Heedless of the night because all was in good fun. A community camaraderie that protected their innocence was the norm. This has diminished over the years. We've seen an increasing number of negative reports on the media causing people to fear this particular night once again. Shutting themselves in behind closed doors to keep out the evil in the dark. This is done by using a few examples of extreme and heinous behavior and projecting them outward to all. I belief this fear is an over bloated illusion meant to keep our society down. It is fed constantly by the media and helps the overall general condition of fear to grow like a weed. Its amazing how a few crazies can keep a whole society penned inside a cave of shadows.

 

 

 


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#23 Feathers

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 04:22 PM

How many children have died from people poisoning Halloween candy?

 

Remember your mom sorting through your Halloween candy as a kid, looking for signs of ‘tainted’ candy laced with poison, needles or razor blades?  It turns out, unless she was just using it as an excuse to steal the good candy before you got it, she was wasting her time.  You are more likely to get attacked by a samurai sword wielding bear while trick or treating than be poisoned by a stranger.  Further, it’s more likely that your Halloween candy will be poisoned or otherwise tampered with by one of your parents or family members, than a stranger.  Think about that while your mom is “checking out” your candy before letting you eat it.

 

So why all the worry?

 

Because the news media needs something to talk about and there’s nothing better for ratings than saying something like “Is your child’s Halloween candy poisoned? 

 

Find out the deadly truth at 11!”

 

Further, while many children die directly after Halloween from non-candy related things (after all, people die every day), if there isn’t an apparent cause the week following Halloween, many-a-sensationalized story gets widely publicized with poisoned Halloween candy generally being blamed. (There are numerous instances of this happening.) This isn’t all bad in theory.  I mean, if there is even a chance that some child’s death was poisoned-candy related, the police (rightly) encourage the news media to tell parents in the area to get rid of their children’s Halloween candy because it might be poisoned.

 

When it turns out the death had nothing to do with Halloween candy, most media outlets tend to have moved on from Halloween stories, so either don’t report a retraction or don’t make it the headline like when they claimed the death was from candy.  Thus, the perception that poisoned Halloween candy is a rampant problem embeds itself in the popular psyche, going all the way back to at least 1970 when the New York Times reported “Halloween goodies that children collect this weekend… may bring them more horror than happiness,” which proceeded to tell parents all about how the candy could potentially be tampered with, even though there had never been an instance of this actually happening at the time.

 

http://www.todayifou...alloween-candy/


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#24 status - Guest

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 12:26 PM

If you don't want to give out candy for whatever reason these other treats are just as good:
 
Stickers, pencils, crayons, play doh, mini lego playsets in a bag, plastic toys, lip balm, cheap make-up for girls, monster masks, eye patches, creepy playing cards, sports cards, any kind of cool trinket will do.

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#25 Feathers

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 01:41 PM

Halloween gives us a time to reflect on the harvest gained in the past year. A time to gather in our thoughts for the winter. Keeping out the cold by sitting next to a warm fire and reflecting on the good and bad things for a bit. It's a natural seasonal type of occurrence I think. Going way back. Ancient in form filled with morphing shapes and changing beliefs. Too bad Halloween has been vilified with bad publicity these past decades. It used to be a holiday of mirth. A happy celebration giving forth the first fruits of the harvest. A community celebration of the sweet kind...


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#26 status - Mad Hatter

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 02:05 PM

Tin Foil hats are in fashion this time of year.

 

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:chuckle:

 


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#27 Ghostly Machines

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 11:25 AM

Causing mischief has been a part of the Halloween tradition since the very beginning.
 
The most ancient roots of Halloween come from the Celts of Great Britain, who believed that the day before their Nov. 1 New Year was a time when spirits came back to haunt and play tricks. On Oct. 31, people dressed up in scary costumes, played games, lit bonfires and left food out on their doorsteps for the ghosts in celebration of this otherworldly event, which the Celts called Samhain.
 
When Great Britain was Christianized in the 800s, the ghoulish games of Samhain merged with All Saints Day and All Souls Day, during which the dead were honored with parades and door-to-door solicitation by peasants for treats — usually a bit of food or money.
 
After the Protestant Reformation, much of England stopped the "treating" side of Halloween because it was connected to Catholic saints, and transferred the trickery to the eve of Guy Fawkes Night, a Nov. 5 holiday celebrating the foiling of the 1605 Gunpowder Plot to blow up British Parliament. Mischief Night in England is still celebrated on Nov. 4.
 
The Irish, Scottish and northern English, meanwhile, kept up much of their Halloween traditions, including the good-natured misbehavior, and brought their ways to North America with the wave of immigration in the 1800s.
 
Before the 20th century, Halloween mischief in the United States and Canada happened on Oct. 31 and consisted of tipping over outhouses, unhinging farmer's gates, throwing eggs at houses and the like. By the 1920s and 30s, however, the celebrations had become more like a rowdy block party, and the acts of vandalism more serious, probably instigated by tensions over the Great Depression and the threat of war, historians say.
 
To stem the vandalism, concerned parents and town leaders tried to ply kids with candy, encouraging the forgotten tradition of trick-or-treating in costume in exchange for sweets, bumping the mischief element from the celebrations of Oct. 31 altogether. It was then that the troublemakers, neighborhood by neighborhood, adopted Oct. 30 as their day to pull pranks. 
 
 
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The notion of dressing up in costume and going from door to door for goods dates back to the Middle Ages, according to Smithsonian.com.
 
“Children and sometimes poor adults would dress up [as saints, angels or demons costumes] and go around door to door during Hallowmas begging for food or money in exchange for songs and prayers, often said on behalf of the dead.”
 
According to Smithsonian.com, back then, it wasn’t called trick-or-treating. It was called “souling” and the beggars were called “soulers.”
 
The practice of trick-or-treating emerged in the U.S. in the 1920s and 1930s.
 
But the earliest known reference to the term “trick or treat” actually comes from a 1927 publication in Canada.
 
Here’s what the Smithsonian found in the Nov. 4, 1927, edition of the Blackie, Alberta Canada Herald:
 
“Hallowe’en provided an opportunity for real strenuous fun. No real damage was done except to the temper of some who had to hunt for wagon wheels, gates, wagons, barrels, etc., much of which decorated the front street. The youthful tormentors were at back door and front demanding edible plunder by the word “trick or treat” to which the inmates gladly responded and sent the robbers away rejoicing.”
 
Still, how exactly Americans adopted the tradition is still a little confusing, History.com reported, though it’s widely understood that Irish and Scottish immigrants brought Halloween traditions to the U.S. with them.
 
Theorists also say it could have been the excessive pranks on Halloween that led to its adoption as a holiday tradition. 
 
These pranks were popular among “rowdy young people” and often amounted to expensive damage, vandalism and physical violence.
 
When World War II broke out, however, trick-or-treating came to a halt due to sugar rationing.
 
Today, Americans spend millions on costumes annually to partake in the door-to-door tradition.
 
 
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When Halloween Was All Tricks and No Treats
 
In this era, when Americans generally lived in small communities and better knew their neighbors, it was often the local grouch who was the brunt of Halloween mischief. The children would cause trouble and the adults would just smile guiltily to themselves, amused by rocking chairs engineered onto rooftops, or pigs set free from sties. But when early 20th-century Americans moved into crowded urban centers—full of big city problems like poverty, segregation, and unemployment—pranking took on a new edge. Kids pulled fire alarms, threw bricks through shop windows, and painted obscenities on the principal’s home. They struck out blindly against property owners, adults, and authority in general. They begged for money or sweets, and threatened vandalism if they didn’t receive them.
 
Some grown-ups began to fight back. Newspapers in the early 20th century reported incidents of homeowners firing buckshot at pranksters who were only 11 or 12 years old. “Letting the air out of tires isn’t fun anymore,” wrote the Superintendent of Schools of Rochester, New York in a newspaper editorial in 1942, as U.S. participation in World War II was escalating. “It’s sabotage. Soaping windows isn’t fun this year. Your government needs soaps and greases for the war … Even ringing doorbells has lost its appeal because it may mean disturbing the sleep of a tired war worker who needs his rest.” That same year, the Chicago City Council voted to abolish Halloween and instead institute a “Conservation Day” on October 31. (Implementation got kicked to the mayor, who doesn’t appear to have done much about it.)
 
The effort to restrain and recast the holiday continued after World War II, as adults moved Halloween celebrations indoors and away from destructive tricks, and gave the holiday over to younger and younger children. The Senate Judiciary Committee under President Truman recommended Halloween be repurposed as “Youth Honor Day” in 1950, hoping that communities would celebrate and cultivate the moral fiber of children. The House of Representatives, sidetracked by the Korean War, neglected to act on the motion, but there were communities that took it up: On October 31, 1955 in Ocala, Florida, a Youth Honor Day king and queen were crowned at a massive party sponsored by the local Moose Lodge. As late as 1962, New York City Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. wanted to change Halloween to UNICEF Day, to shift the emphasis of the night to charity.
 
 
Happy Halloween!
 
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#28 Ghostly Machines

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 11:26 AM

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:GoldenSmile1:

 


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#29 Feathers

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 05:57 PM

Happy Halloween Ghost!

 

:hangingfromastar:

 

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:smokesmall:

 

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:smokesmall:

 

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#30 Digger

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 08:05 PM

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:chuckle:


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