Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 3 votes

The Constant Readers Thread!

chicken coup

36 replies to this topic

#1 Ludikrus

Ludikrus

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 849 posts
  • LocationEverywhere

Posted 13 August 2015 - 08:12 AM

Anyone like historical fiction?  This great series by Colleen McCullough is a great collection describing the last days of the Roman Republic.  Starting with Gaius Marius and ending with Antony and Cleopatra.  Her research into the history of the period is extensive.  All the details are there.  All your favorite Roman characters of the past are represented.  What's really great about it is the life she gives to real historical figures:  Caesar and his generals, Cicero, Sulla, Marius, and many others.  All the minor players have their own human foibles and talents showcased.  Set within the historical action of the period she gives real personality to all these important figures in history.

Masters of Rome series by Colleen McCullough

  • The first book of the series details Gaius Marius and his rise to consul...7 times!
  • The second book details a very colorful Lucius Cornelius Sulla.  Low class patrician making good and becoming dictator.
  • The third and fourth details Caesar in his younger days and his rise to power.
  • The fifth an sixth volume's describe Caesar at his full height of power and his eventual murder.
  • The last and seventh book is the tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra and the rise of Augustus.

Reading this series may help to improve an interest in Roman History.  It goes well with the texts, documentaries, and movies available on the subject.  Especially, on the religious and political psychology of the day.  In there time, one can suppose that it would be called philosophy.  The Greek and Persian worlds and their ideas are all represented in these volumes.  Kudos to Colleen McCullough and her massive effort to describe the past and it's lessons.

 

:wub:

 


  • 0



#2 Ludikrus

Ludikrus

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 849 posts
  • LocationEverywhere

Posted 17 October 2015 - 11:47 AM

Tired of scrolling through pages of the same old books from the same old authors using the same old formulas?  Well, fear not my friends. In this thread I hope to provide more interesting alternatives to the grand fiction (or non) of the modern novel.  Favorite authors, searing subject matter, great character studies, and interesting and overlooked stories is the goal here.

I'll start today with a favorite author of mine that touches on all the above:  Taylor Caldwell.  Here's a wiki link - https://en.wikipedia...Taylor_Caldwell

She tackles heavy steal industry dynasties and their wares.  Religious subject matter of intense scrutiny. Hard subject matters, indeed.  Nice character studies on historical figures such as Ghengis Kahn, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Peracles and Aspasia, just to name a few. Religious characters, as well.  

A fan favorite, in her day, was 'Captains and the Kings'. A rags to riches story!  A pretty good TV mini series was made of that one, too.  Many of her novels describe what we call the TPTB or the "the new world order" today.

Check out the wiki link for a quick perusal of what she has to offer. She is an extremely worthy author to read.

 

:)

 


  • 0

#3 status - Major Tom

status - Major Tom
  • Guests

Posted 18 October 2015 - 10:02 AM

I don't know about the 'seering subject matter' but this book can burn holes in your underwear:

 

Afterthoughts upon Farting shewing its great utility; with curious Anecdotes of eminent Farters...
 
Gives warning over overindulgence in the art by quoting the case of Simon Tup, "the Farting Blacksmith" from Kirkeaton, Yorkshire, who "had the singular and ingenious talent of accompanying any instrument...which he could perform so admirably in time, tone and tune, as to deceive the nicest judges...The fate of the poor fellow was very melancholy; by an uncommon exertion which he made in the famous song 'Blow high, blow low', he unfortunately broke a blood-vessel of which he instantly died."
 
 
7lci773.jpg
 

  • 0

#4 Ludikrus

Ludikrus

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 849 posts
  • LocationEverywhere

Posted 20 October 2015 - 12:27 PM

T.H. White

The Once and Future King

Anyone into legends, myths, and history?  This story about King Arthur and his adventures with Merlin is outstanding.  It's a wonderful account of how Merlin teaches young Arthur about how to be a king. Courses of action taken against sound advice and the results that occur from bad desision.  Redemption, too is a factor in the story.  Arthur does his best, of course, but in the end he's just as human as everyone else.

The turning into different animals shapeshifts the story into a philosphocial discussion on what it means to be in different envirnments of being and try to learn from them.  It's highly imaginative. Though it seems written for children, it is not!  Disney turned the story into a watered down version in 'The Sword in the Stone'.  Reading the book brings much more flavor and thought provoking attitude to its nature.

Merlin is quite interesting, too!  He lives backwards.  He's born at the end of time and lives his life backwards. A Benjamin Button kind of twist.  He knows the future but, sometimes he forgets it.  Good Gimmick and quite entertaining on the anachronisms it presents.  Like bringing elements of current knowledge of the 'future' and bringing it back to the time of Arthur. Much irony....

There is a second book or 'part 5' called 'The Book of Merlin'.  This one was published after the author died.  It's unfinished, but, all the elements to close the story are there.  It details Merlins last advice and shapeshifting lesson given to Arthur before his final battle with Mordred.

 

tumblr_mrbb6zEuuO1qkiyi1o1_400.gif


  • 0

#5 status - SK

status - SK
  • Guests

Posted 20 October 2015 - 08:06 PM

T.H. White

The Once and Future King

Anyone into legends, myths, and history?  This story about King Arthur and his adventures with Merlin is outstanding.  It's a wonderful account of how Merlin teaches young Arthur about how to be a king. Courses of action taken against sound advice and the results that occur from bad desision.  Redemption, too is a factor in the story.  Arthur does his best, of course, but in the end he's just as human as everyone else.

The turning into different animals shapeshifts the story into a philosphocial discussion on what it means to be in different envirnments of being and try to learn from them.  It's highly imaginative. Though it seems written for children, it is not!  Disney turned the story into a watered down version in 'The Sword in the Stone'.  Reading the book brings much more flavor and thought provoking attitude to its nature.

Merlin is quite interesting, too!  He lives backwards.  He's born at the end of time and lives his life backwards. A Benjamin Button kind of twist.  He knows the future but, sometimes he forgets it.  Good Gimmick and quite entertaining on the anachronisms it presents.  Like bringing elements of current knowledge of the 'future' and bringing it back to the time of Arthur. Much irony....

There is a second book or 'part 5' called 'The Book of Merlin'.  This one was published after the author died.  It's unfinished, but, all the elements to close the story are there.  It details Merlins last advice and shapeshifting lesson given to Arthur before his final battle with Mordred.

 

tumblr_mrbb6zEuuO1qkiyi1o1_400.gif

 

:bumpsmall:

 

What is might? What is right?
 
Arthur takes his round table knights and challenges them to use their violence and vice to right the wrongs in the world.  To take all the power in his and their possession and channel it for this purpose. Using his divine right to rule to bring the patrician knights into a better mode of being human. The idea of chivalry, noble service, justice, and peace.  That's the altruistic theme in the book!  
 
Great read!  Thanks for the reminder.
 
:beer:

  • 0

#6 status - Guest

status - Guest
  • Guests

Posted 20 October 2015 - 08:49 PM

T.H. White

The Once and Future King

Anyone into legends, myths, and history?  This story about King Arthur and his adventures with Merlin is outstanding.  It's a wonderful account of how Merlin teaches young Arthur about how to be a king. Courses of action taken against sound advice and the results that occur from bad desision.  Redemption, too is a factor in the story.  Arthur does his best, of course, but in the end he's just as human as everyone else.

The turning into different animals shapeshifts the story into a philosphocial discussion on what it means to be in different envirnments of being and try to learn from them.  It's highly imaginative. Though it seems written for children, it is not!  Disney turned the story into a watered down version in 'The Sword in the Stone'.  Reading the book brings much more flavor and thought provoking attitude to its nature.

Merlin is quite interesting, too!  He lives backwards.  He's born at the end of time and lives his life backwards. A Benjamin Button kind of twist.  He knows the future but, sometimes he forgets it.  Good Gimmick and quite entertaining on the anachronisms it presents.  Like bringing elements of current knowledge of the 'future' and bringing it back to the time of Arthur. Much irony....

There is a second book or 'part 5' called 'The Book of Merlin'.  This one was published after the author died.  It's unfinished, but, all the elements to close the story are there.  It details Merlins last advice and shapeshifting lesson given to Arthur before his final battle with Mordred.

 

tumblr_mrbb6zEuuO1qkiyi1o1_400.gif

 

 

 

:bumpsmall:

 

What is might? What is right?
 
Arthur takes his round table knights and challenges them to use their violence and vice to right the wrongs in the world.  To take all the power in his and their possession and channel it for this purpose. Using his divine right to rule to bring the patrician knights into a better mode of being human. The idea of chivalry, noble service, justice, and peace.  That's the altruistic theme in the book!  
 
Great read!  Thanks for the reminder.
 
:beer:

 

 

The author uses Mallory as his source material and puts himself into it as sort of a meta-historian. The use of medieval history to describe scenes and social settings is quite learned and colourful.

 

:)


  • 0

#7 status - Jorge

status - Jorge
  • Guests

Posted 21 October 2015 - 11:19 AM

What are the odds of finding a good and interesting book in babel?
 
 
 
dyson_1-031011_jpg_470x453_q85.jpg
 
 
Remember now, it's not infinite.  That belongs entirely to God!
 
:wub:
 

  • 0

#8 status - CT

status - CT
  • Guests

Posted 21 October 2015 - 12:14 PM

 

What are the odds of finding a good and interesting book in babel?
 
 
 
dyson_1-031011_jpg_470x453_q85.jpg
 
 
Remember now, it's not infinite.  That belongs entirely to God!
 
:wub:

 

 

:)

 

tumblr_mjima3Orsl1qcu0j0o1_400.jpg

 


  • 0

#9 status - Guest

status - Guest
  • Guests

Posted 21 October 2015 - 12:54 PM

Googles Mysterious Codes
 
jorge-luis-borges-google-doodle-230811.j
 
 
The NWO makes good use of the resources at their disposal. They plot and conspire and put it right in your face. Yet like the blind we see not what is before us. As a case in point the Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges was celebrated August 24th. Many reveled at the image presented and saw at once it was a cryptic clue to the mysteries of the modern era. Few have dared to enter the enigma as deeply as I.
 
At first glance we should be enthralled at the depth of meaning revealed in the image. We instantly see the labyrinthine complexity of a very broad illustration. We see the infamous Library of Babel extolled by Borges. We see an underworld of a great metropolis morphed with its foundations.
 

  • 0

#10 Ludikrus

Ludikrus

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 849 posts
  • LocationEverywhere

Posted 22 October 2015 - 01:16 PM

Halloween Story time!  But, in the days when the following story was published, the imaginations of mankind were positively electric!

 

Apparently, on the night Lord Byron challanged those at his gathering to write an especially scary story, this tale began to percolate in the mind John William Polidorif:

The Vampyre

http://www.sff.net/p...ld/l_vampyr.htm

Of course, there is a better work that transpired in the mind of Mary Shelley that resulted from that challange...


  • 0



Reply to this topic



  



Similar Topics Collapse


Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: chicken coup

IPB Skin By Virteq