Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Why Didn't North American Indians Develop Alcoholic Beverages

History

12 replies to this topic

#1 BetsyGritt

BetsyGritt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 46 posts
  • LocationUnited States

Posted 03 December 2015 - 02:23 PM

Yes, there are several other tribes who did develop mild alcoholic beverages such as the Aztecs having pulque. But, what about natural fermentation from the sugar bearing fruits and berries.  How come no wine was developed?  Nothing substantial in strong drinking spirits of that nature.  I can't seem to find any tradition involving the process of making spirits before Columbus.
 
 

  • 1

#2 Jesse Jimmie

Jesse Jimmie

    Admin

  • Administrators
  • 1,267 posts

Posted 03 December 2015 - 02:35 PM

Alcohol is not good on the hunt. Besides wasn't there other forms of 'strong spirit'?  Peyote was used as means to enter the spirit world from what I hear.

pIRxb2.gif

 

:)


  • 0

To Cluck or not to Cluck, that is the question...


#3 BetsyGritt

BetsyGritt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 46 posts
  • LocationUnited States

Posted 03 December 2015 - 03:16 PM

Alcohol is not good on the hunt. Besides wasn't there other forms of 'strong spirit'?  Peyote was used as means to enter the spirit world from what I hear.

pIRxb2.gif

 

:)

 

There are all kinds of natural things that can induce different states in the mind and the body:
 
Use of Caffeinated Drink in pre-Columbian North America
 
The discovery – made by analyzing plant residues in pottery beakers from Cahokia and its surroundings – is the earliest known use of this ‘black drink’ in North America. It pushes back the date by at least 500 years, and adds to the evidence that a broad cultural and trade network thrived in the Midwest and southeastern U.S. as early as 1050 CE.
 
image_512_1.jpg
 
Europeans were the first to record the use of what they called ‘the black drink’ by Native American men in the southeast. This drink, a dark tea made from the roasted leaves of the Yaupon holly, Ilex vomitoria, contains caffeine.
 

Edited by BetsyGritt, 03 December 2015 - 03:17 PM.

  • 0

#4 status - Guest

status - Guest
  • Guests

Posted 03 December 2015 - 04:43 PM

Europeans had a form of LSD at the time.  It was called ergot and caused much misunderstanding.  Especially from the ones NOT influenced by the drug.


  • 0

#5 Magdalena

Magdalena

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 03 December 2015 - 05:29 PM

Is it true there was no strong drink in North America?  I figure since fermenting berries and grains and corn comes natural.  All they really missed was the means to distill it into something stronger. The only native American crops which are commonly used for alcohol production are corn and potatoes and they're both used in making distilled spirits. 


  • 0

#6 Magdalena

Magdalena

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 03 December 2015 - 06:35 PM

.


Edited by Magdalena, 03 December 2015 - 06:36 PM.

  • 0

#7 status - Popcorn

status - Popcorn
  • Guests

Posted 03 December 2015 - 06:40 PM

It figures. a society, even a small one, needs to stay in one place long enough to even distill strong alcohol.  It takes time to make the good stuff!

 

6032d519850aa2c617ca3702aee371ba.jpg

 


  • 0

#8 status - Guest

status - Guest
  • Guests

Posted 03 December 2015 - 07:37 PM

Europeans had a form of LSD at the time.  It was called ergot and caused much misunderstanding.  Especially from the ones NOT influenced by the drug.

 

grapes were there in some areas. don't forget about honey; mead can be made from that.  you can make beer from just about any grain. 
 
:)
 

.

 

:D

  • 0

#9 Ludikrus

Ludikrus

    Premium Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 838 posts
  • LocationEverywhere

Posted 03 December 2015 - 08:14 PM

It figures. a society, even a small one, needs to stay in one place long enough to even distill strong alcohol.  It takes time to make the good stuff!

 

6032d519850aa2c617ca3702aee371ba.jpg

 

 

 

grapes were there in some areas. don't forget about honey; mead can be made from that.  you can make beer from just about any grain. 
 
:)
 

 

:D

 

 

Yes, all low level alcohol content.  Not until the high spirits of heavy duty distillery became known.  Gotta consider the indeginious knwowledge of the local plants.  All sorts of concoctions can do all sorts of things.  I figure all indiginous people know their lands and what they contain very well.  That was past...now?  How many 'indiginous people' know their lands and what it contains

 

:cokesmiley:


  • 0

#10 status - Guest

status - Guest
  • Guests

Posted 04 December 2015 - 12:39 PM

Injections of sugar, molasses, and rum.
 
Give the Native Americans Alcohol and cheap guns - That worked its own will on the destruction within the native societies!
 
It worked in the sense that it helped contribute to their 'delinquency' in any form of participation in the power that conquered them. 
 
It wouldn't have mattered in any case. TPTB would never have allowed 'savages' any chance of authority in their realm of domination.

  • 0



Reply to this topic



  



Similar Topics Collapse


1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

IPB Skin By Virteq