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Private Economy with Public Magnificence


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#41 Magdalena

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 02:37 PM

In a meeting with merchants and bankers at the British Board of Trade, members asked Franklin how the American Colonies managed to collect enough money to support their poor.   Franklin replied, "That is simple.   In the Colonies, we issue our own money.  
It is called Colonial Scrip.   We issue it in proper proportion to the demands of trade and industry to make the products pass easily from the producers to the consumers.   In this manner, creating for ourselves our own paper money, we control its purchasing power, and we have no interest to pay to no one." Both quotes from Charles Binderup, Ibid.   "It passed through no banker's hands, but was loaned to the people direct, thus saving banking toll and banking restriction of volume; nor are there any panics or fluctuations recorded.   Thomas Powell, M.P., of England, who had acted as governor and commander-in-chief of all provinces, in a book written by him in 1768, says in regard to this colonial system of money: 'I will venture to say that there never was a wiser or better measure, never one better calculated to serve the uses of an increasing country, and never was a measure more steadily pursued or more faithfully executed for forty years together than the loan office in Pennsylvania, formed and administered by the assembly of the province.'" Samuel Leavitt, Our Money Wars, 1894.  
 
"After Franklin gave explanations on the true cause of the prosperity of the Colonies, the Parliament exacted laws forbidding the use of this money in the payment of taxes. This decision brought so many drawbacks and so much poverty to the people that it was the main cause of the Revolution. The suppression of the Colonial money was a much more important reason for the general uprising than the Tea and Stamp Act." Peter Cooper, industrialist, inventor, philanthropist, and Presidential candidate. 
 
 
9d1346f62aed97044b25072fbcfcf9a5.jpg
 
They really gave Franklin a new sense of the problem. When he came home after the reaction he received in England, his mind was on defeating the Crown and all it stood for. But, he also new the more insidious problem behind the Crown. All from that debt incurred upon the King for his own greed and prosperity!

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#42 Ludikrus

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 12:52 PM

 

Colonial violence was then directed towards the policy makers and their enforcers. Governor Thomas Hutchinson being one.
 
Wouldn't the men who perpetrated these acts be called terrorists by today's standards?
 

 

 

 

 

There is a difference.....it is in whom they targeted. They made there complaints known to the only authority close at hand. The ones doing the bidding of the 'Crown'... not foolish acts of idiotic violence against the public. But, calculated attacks against the TBTB. 
 
Under it all, important colonists did know where the real power was coming from....seems like they wanted their own piece of the American pie. To create and control their own pyramid!
 
:candleflame:
 
Look how shiny it is in the dark...
 
1.jpg?i10c=img.resize%28height:160%29
 
Like the sky...
 
:spaceships_010:

 

 

Terrorists?

 

To the British Crown and their Corporate handlers?

 

:up_and_down_3_text:
 

This brings us up to the Boston Tea Party. A favorite issue in American History!

 

The Boston Tea Party was much more than just a protest on tax. The protesters (or terrorists by today's standards) had a deep respect for private property. So much so that they went out of there way to make this point by only burning the tea. Not stealing it and not destroying other kinds of property to do it. Even the Bostonian's who had tea burned theirs to show protest on the inner machinations of Governor Hutchinson. That old fool practiced his tomfoolery by giving plum government jobs to his cronies and friends. They, of course, robbed the system blind. That old bell rings true today!

 

:ph34r:


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#43 BetsyGritt

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 03:34 PM

 

Why can't I rate this thread?

 

 

Really? I didn't have a problem. It's up on the top of the page?!  B)

 

 

dbc9ebdd77c98a4d23c4576face1bd2b.jpg

 

 

 

 

road-to-revolution-2010-48-728.jpg?cb=12

Events leading up to the American Revolution!

 

https://www.haikudec...tion-biBj1A8svH


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#44 status - Guest

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 03:49 PM

 

 
 

 

Really? I didn't have a problem. It's up on the top of the page?!  B)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Events leading up to the American Revolution!

 

https://www.haikudec...tion-biBj1A8svH

 

 

That's a crappy slideshow

 

 

7194382_orig.jpg


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#45 status - Guest

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Posted 04 February 2016 - 12:46 AM

 

In a meeting with merchants and bankers at the British Board of Trade, members asked Franklin how the American Colonies managed to collect enough money to support their poor.   Franklin replied, "That is simple.   In the Colonies, we issue our own money.  
It is called Colonial Scrip.   We issue it in proper proportion to the demands of trade and industry to make the products pass easily from the producers to the consumers.   In this manner, creating for ourselves our own paper money, we control its purchasing power, and we have no interest to pay to no one." Both quotes from Charles Binderup, Ibid.   "It passed through no banker's hands, but was loaned to the people direct, thus saving banking toll and banking restriction of volume; nor are there any panics or fluctuations recorded.   Thomas Powell, M.P., of England, who had acted as governor and commander-in-chief of all provinces, in a book written by him in 1768, says in regard to this colonial system of money: 'I will venture to say that there never was a wiser or better measure, never one better calculated to serve the uses of an increasing country, and never was a measure more steadily pursued or more faithfully executed for forty years together than the loan office in Pennsylvania, formed and administered by the assembly of the province.'" Samuel Leavitt, Our Money Wars, 1894.  
 
"After Franklin gave explanations on the true cause of the prosperity of the Colonies, the Parliament exacted laws forbidding the use of this money in the payment of taxes. This decision brought so many drawbacks and so much poverty to the people that it was the main cause of the Revolution. The suppression of the Colonial money was a much more important reason for the general uprising than the Tea and Stamp Act." Peter Cooper, industrialist, inventor, philanthropist, and Presidential candidate. 
 
 
9d1346f62aed97044b25072fbcfcf9a5.jpg
 
They really gave Franklin a new sense of the problem. When he came home after the reaction he received in England, his mind was on defeating the Crown and all it stood for. But, he also new the more insidious problem behind the Crown. All from that debt incurred upon the King for his own greed and prosperity!

 

 

This is a never ending war!

 

 

 

 
 
Who is the real enemy?
 
 
;)

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#46 status - Guest

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Posted 04 February 2016 - 01:21 PM

It seems the thing we did not build is alive and well and living beyond its own hubris!

 

 

You-Didnt-Build-That.jpg

 

Suppose he's right?

 

:(

 

What is this thing that should not be....?

 

 
 
:The-Devil-animated:
 

 

 


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#47 status - Golden Numbers

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 01:18 PM

Fear is in the way.  

 

 

Look at L.A.

 

 

Resources to promote home schooling would go a long way to mitigate any fear associated with these powerful injections of media controlled ideologies! What is this fanatical frenzy doing these young minds? What kind of fear and fantasy will they face 25 years from now?

 

Not to mention the values of consumerism and what that contains.  Economical Values?  King George III was driven to madness and destruction from the debt incurred upon his subjects and then himself. 

 

 

Provide the keys to self sufficiency!

 

 

Thomas is a Paine in the ass!

 

;)

 

Ah yes, the art of invisible slavery. The Crown was used by others to collect a debt! 
 
 
GWM4LRR.gif
 
 
That's nothing new. Wars cost money. The invisible war runs deep!

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#48 status - Pie

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 01:46 PM

 

Ah yes, the art of invisible slavery. The Crown was used by others to collect a debt! 
 
 
GWM4LRR.gif
 
 
That's nothing new. Wars cost money. The invisible war runs deep!

 

 

I guess it's a matter of accumulating all the pieces to show this invisible war. Of course, there is another veil to the mystery and that involves the deeper war to control the overall spirit of mankind. The veil this thread seems to penetrate is the great and secret show of inner deeds done to force economic control over an entire populace. Veils covering more veils...

 

jOeuumM.gif

 

The symbolic nature of lady liberty runs deep!

 

It looks like the forefathers of America saw the 'industrial revolution' coming. They saw the 'top' men of commerce in Britain for what they were. Therefore, I think the more affluent Americans wanted to rise up and equal that kind of power. Geared toward more rights for property holders. 

 

 


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#49 Magdalena

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 02:33 PM

AN00012379_001_l.jpg
 
 
Early depictions of America as a woman appeared before the Revolutionary War. 
 
 
 
:barbiegun:

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#50 status - Guest

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 03:03 PM

 

10 Amazing Women of the Revolutionary War
 
“I desire you would remember the ladies”
-March 31, 1776, Abigail Adams to her husband, John Adams
 

 

 

 

 

Early depictions of America as a woman appeared before the Revolutionary War. 
 
 
 
:barbiegun:

 

 

fKbBlMO.gif

 

Abigail Adams, letter to her husband John Adams, regarding the Constitution, 1776

 

 ...by the way in the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be necessary to make, I desire you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favourable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If perticular care and attention is not paid to the Ladies, we are determined to foment a Rebelion and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation.

     

  "That your Sex are Naturally Tyrannical is a Truth so thoroughly established as to admit of no dispute, but such of you as wish to be happy willingly give up the harsh title of Master for the more tender and endearing one of Friend. Why then not put it out of the power of the vicious and the Lawless to use us with cruelty and indignity with impunity. Men of Sense in all Ages abhor those customs which treat us only as the vassals of your Sex. Regard us then as Beings placed by providence under your protection and in imitation of the Supreem Being make use of that power only for our happiness."

 

:) 


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