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Naughty Nuns, Flatulent Monks, and Other Surprises

History religion Medieval Marginalia

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#41 Feathers

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Posted 07 February 2018 - 07:59 PM

:chicken:

 

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#42 Jesse Jimmie

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Posted 07 February 2018 - 08:06 PM

:Laughing-rolf:  :Laughing-rolf:  :Laughing-rolf:

 

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To Cluck or not to Cluck, that is the question...


#43 Ghostly Machines

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Posted 07 February 2018 - 08:33 PM

:chuckle:

 

 

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#44 Feathers

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Posted 07 February 2018 - 08:38 PM

:chuckle:


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#45 status - Divine Wind

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Posted 23 December 2018 - 11:27 AM

From Fart Gods to Farting Out One’s Soul: The Historic Ritualization of Farts
 
They command attention, bring silence into noisy environments and have been associated with the utterances of gods for thousands of years. In fact, entire rituals have been designed around them. Farts. Would you believe it? 
 
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Farts in the Ancient World
 
The spiritualization of farting was not restricted to northern latitudes. A specialist in the history of gastric wind, Professor Valerie Allen, wrote the groundbreaking book “ On Farting: Language and Laughter in the Middle Ages”, in which we learn that most medieval theologians recorded farting as “the product of decomposition… the mark of death.” Manichaeism was a mystical religion based on dualistic principals that at one time claimed to have had St. Augustine among its members. He believed farts were the act of "freeing divine light from the body” and St. Augustine also referred to people who could produce odorless “musical sounds” like “singing” from their behinds.
 
The philosopher Pythagoras believed the soul ( pneuma) was breath, and because a fart was a sort of breath, as he was struggling with the mechanics of trigonometry, he was also concerned that if a person pushed hard enough they might “fart out his or her soul.”  The ancient origins of “fart fearing” is better understood when we consider that several wars having been directly provoked by farts. In Book II Chapter XI of Josephus’ Wars of The Jews we are told it was a “randomly presented fart” that set off a chain of events that led to the revolt against the 6th century King Apries of Egypt. He wrote “an irreverent Roman soldier lowered his pants, bent over, and “spoke such words as you might expect upon such a posture.” A steely silence spread over Jerusalem and because the unforeseen incident took place shortly before the Passover, a riot broke out to capture the farter “that led to the deaths of over 10,000 people.” 
 

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