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Holy Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing


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#1 Wicked

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 12:46 PM

The earliest use of the F-word discovered
 
‘Roger Fuckebythenavel’ as seen in the Cheshire County Court Rolls – TNA CHES 29/23 – photo by Paul Booth
 
Roger-Fuckbythenavel.png
 
 
Medieval Swear Words
 
 
What were bad words in the Middle Ages? In her book, Holy Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing, Melissa Mohr takes a look at curse words from the ancient Romans to the modern day. Like with many aspects of medieval society, the way they swore was much different than ours.
 
 
An entertaining and far ranging historical journey....
 
18d15077d1131da5455e51d065f5566f.jpg
 
Butt loads of wine?
 
 

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#2 Rolandvere

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 12:58 PM

:D

 

how 'bout rum?
 
tumblr_lif5nqVVTp1qadi39o1_500.gif

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#3 Red

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 01:05 PM

12928671.png

 

 

http://forum.chicken...ther-surprises/

 

:LOL: :LOL: :LOL:


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#4 Wicked

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 01:21 PM

He talked about his bad habits (including drinking and bumming cigarettes from some of his students outside in the designated smoking areas), made crude pop culture references, and, yes, he even swore (mildly) in class. In other words, I loved him. The best thing about him was that he knew how to make Middle English (practically a foreign language by today’s standards) understandable and, most of all, FUN.

 

 

 
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#5 Ludikrus

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 01:28 PM

:Laughing-rolf:

 

horsey-medieval-thinking-global-warming.

 

:smiley-laughing024:


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#6 BetsyGritt

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 02:45 PM

 

:D

 

how 'bout rum?
 
tumblr_lif5nqVVTp1qadi39o1_500.gif

 

 

:rolleyes:


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#7 Wicked

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 02:46 PM

38 Slang Terms From Colonial Times That Need to Be Brought Back
 
DEMANDERS FOR GLIMMER OR FIRE, BAWDY BASKETS, MORTS, AUTEM MORTS, WALKING MORTS, DOXIES, DELLES, KINCHING MORTS, KINCHING COES.
 
 
colonial_men.jpg

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#8 BertNicker

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 04:21 PM

:D  :D  :D

 

:bumpsmall:

 

 

This thread yields good stuff for the vocabulary!

 

:)

 

19 Words From Medieval Times That We Should Definitely Bring Back 
 
Old words are cool. They’ve got this sort of forbidden vibe to them; we haven’t used them in so long, so unearthing them is at once a tribute, yet also this weird longing to capture a spirit and time now relegated to the history books.
 
 
Anon (later on): I’ll see you anon, or I’ll see you another time.
 
B)

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#9 status - Guest

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 01:52 PM

Ever wonder where the word "shit" comes from. Well here it is:
 
Certain types of manure used to be transported (as everything was back then) by ship. In dry form it weighs a lot less, but once water (at sea) hit it. It not only became heavier, but the process of fermentation began again, of which a by-product is methane gas.
 
As the stuff was stored below decks in bundles you can see what could (and did) happen; methane began to build up below decks and the first time someone came below at night with a lantern. BOOOOM!!!
 
Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was discovered what was happening.
 
After that, the bundles of manure where always stamped with the term "S.H.I.T" on them which meant to the sailors to "Ship High In Transit." In other words, high enough off the lower decks so that any water that came into the hold would not touch this volatile cargo and start the production of methane.
 
Bet you didn't know that one. 
 
:P
 
 
:rolleyes:
 
Historical acronyms and lingo..
 
 
:)
 
 

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#10 Wicked

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 10:52 AM

 

:D

 

how 'bout rum?
 
tumblr_lif5nqVVTp1qadi39o1_500.gif

 

 

;)

 

156289-BMMANKOFF.jpg


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