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The Language Of The Web


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#21 status - McMimic

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 12:56 PM

Why the Best Memes Go Viral
 
Memes – from the Greek for “that which is imitated” – were once defined as being self-replicating units of culture. This included anything that could be learned, remembered and spread from one brain to another, such as the concept of god all the way to the popular Budweiser “Wazzup” catchphrase.
 
Through the internet, the idea moved from the conceptual sphere into the viscous reality of data and pixels, transforming it into something more traceable: a segment of media that is copied rapidly. This includes images, text, video, a combination of all three and sometimes real-world actions.
 
What’s novel here is an inversion of control – political memes are no longer rare flashes of uncensored personality or intensely manicured visual messages. They are now born from the swamps of the internet in real time, distributed from the bottom up. They have grown into a form of anarchic folk propaganda, ranging from tolerable epigrams to glittering hate-soaked image macros akin to a million little rogue Pravdas.
 
 
Life experience and the science of mimicry and imitation suggest that information is more likely to spread faster when it comes from high status members of a group, i.e. the top influencers. This is largely due to lower status members being more likely to mimic high status members and therefore agree with and then share this information.
 
This is what was hypothesized for Internet memes in the aforementioned PhD thesis. Yet surprisingly results did not support the hypothesis.
 
Contrary to the expected, memes started by low status individuals (i.e. those having a higher number of responses to threads they themselves started and a higher number of responses to comments on threads started by others) spread faster than memes started by moderate or high status individuals (i.e. those having those having a lower number of responses to threads they themselves started and a lower number of responses to comments on threads started by others).
 
One evidence-based explanation for these results is that low status individuals are more likely to embrace fringe ideas earlier on in a meme’s rise to stardom in comparison with when high status individuals join the show. This fits well with other meme research, where the more original memes that are found at the fringe of meme similarity space have greater potential for going viral (see finding 2 above) than those that are less original. This suggests that low status members of a network may be the key drivers of Internet meme evolution.
 
 
Many linguistic factors determine how easily people recall words and sentences. Some factors are straightforward. Shorter words and sentences, for instance, are easier to remember than longer ones. Other factors, however, are far from intuitive but reflect fundamental aspects of how human cognition works. Emotional arousal improves recall, so the presence of words expressing positive and negative sentiments like nice and ugly have some impact on memorability. Similarly, concrete words like house are generally easier to recall than abstract words like proof in short-term memory tasks.
 
 

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#22 status - Anon

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 11:07 AM

Memes are like the old propaganda art from the past...
 
'Agitation propaganda'
 
Building a better tomorrow
 
Using a single drawing and a few sentences of text--the same raw material used to create Marmaduke--propaganda posters were supposed to influence the way people thought about their government and even their fellow man. As the below collection of posters demonstrates, no matter how unsuccessful the poster, propaganda is invaluable at teaching two timeless lessons: Your government thinks you're stupid, and when faced with unreasonable expectations, some people will lose their shit in hilarious ways.
 
 
20389.jpg
 
The message: And we've got the modest, one-bedroom apartments to prove it!
 
The Problem?
 
 
 

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#23 status - Roadrunner

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 11:31 AM

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#24 status - Guest

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 05:20 PM

Memes are ancient. I consider a cathedral to be a meme. Look at what it represents. A structure that contains ideas, philosophies, and theologies. A giant symbol of dogma to push mankind forward. Most of the time in a forceful way. An engine of power generating economical prosperity or famine. 
 
A statue, too. Egotistical in nature. Containing all the ideas the individual represents. Injecting a brand to sell the notion of physical immortality. Giving forth their artificial greatness to countless generations ahead.
 
Take the time to consider their presence. No man is perfect. Not even in shiny bronze. 
 
Consider all the giant tombs ever built by men. Erecting these massive structures only to fulfill a massive ego. It has the benefit of perpetuating the power of men over other men. It attaches its tentacles ever onward to each generation...
 
Using fear and envy to degrade our powers of perception.
 
 

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#25 status - Instant Imagine

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 11:01 PM

The psychology of emojis
 
Emojis have taken over my communication—and I’m far from alone. According to Swyft Media, 74 percent of people in the U.S. regularly use stickers, emoticons or emojis in their online communication, sending an average of 96 emojis or stickers per day.
 
All this adds up to a total of six billion emoticons or stickers flying around the world every day on mobile messaging apps.
 
Scientists have discovered that when we look at a smiley face online, the same parts of the brain are activated as when we look at a real human face. Our mood changes, and we might even alter our facial expressions to match the emotion of the emoticon.
 
What’s really interesting is that this is not something we’re born with as babies. It’s something our brains have developed in the last few years with the emergence of emoticons and emojis. Essentially, social media culture has created a new brain pattern within us.
 
They’re changing our speech patterns
 
Both emoticons and emojis are recognized and processed by the brain as nonverbal information, which mean we read them as emotional communication, not words.
 
And emotional communication can just as important as words in conveying a message clearly. For example, in spoken communication, researchers now know that if speakers aren’t allowed to use gestures, they becomes less fluent.
 
Essentially, emojis are doing what the tone of voice does on the telephone and what expressions and gestures do in face-to-face communication.
 
There’s even evidence that emojis are actually shifting our vocabulary.Instagram discovered that as emoji use goes up, Internet slang like “rofl,” “bae,” etc., goes down as users choose their emoji counterparts instead.
 
In-depth emoji insights on Instagram
 
The app recently added the ability to use emoji as hashtags, opening up the first chance to gather real data on how people use emojis and what they use them to signify.
 
In another Instagram emoji study, faces account for six of the top ten, pointing toward the idea that people are using emoji to convey something that text alone can lack: emotion.
 
Now that we know how emojis work within us emotionally and psychologically, let’s take a look at how brands have been using them to show more fun and personality. Here’s a look at five cool emoji marketing examples.
 
 
 

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#26 Feathers

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 11:59 PM

 

Memes are ancient. I consider a cathedral to be a meme. Look at what it represents. A structure that contains ideas, philosophies, and theologies. A giant symbol of dogma to push mankind forward. Most of the time in a forceful way. An engine of power generating economical prosperity or famine. 
 
A statue, too. Egotistical in nature. Containing all the ideas the individual represents. Injecting a brand to sell the notion of physical immortality. Giving forth their artificial greatness to countless generations ahead.
 
Take the time to consider their presence. No man is perfect. Not even in shiny bronze. 
 
Consider all the giant tombs ever built by men. Erecting these massive structures only to fulfill a massive ego. It has the benefit of perpetuating the power of men over other men. It attaches its tentacles ever onward to each generation...
 
Using fear and envy to degrade our powers of perception.

 

 

Should we destroy all the statues then? Might as well destroy the knowledge needed to even make them. How far do we go?


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#27 Riddikulus

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 02:26 PM

 

Memes are like the old propaganda art from the past...
 
'Agitation propaganda'
 
Building a better tomorrow
 
Using a single drawing and a few sentences of text--the same raw material used to create Marmaduke--propaganda posters were supposed to influence the way people thought about their government and even their fellow man. As the below collection of posters demonstrates, no matter how unsuccessful the poster, propaganda is invaluable at teaching two timeless lessons: Your government thinks you're stupid, and when faced with unreasonable expectations, some people will lose their shit in hilarious ways.
 
 
20389.jpg
 
The message: And we've got the modest, one-bedroom apartments to prove it!
 
The Problem?
 

 

 

Static images and text. Yes, they work. But, there is always more...

 

When motion pictures and cinematography came along new avenues for psychological expression became available. Cutting and splicing film together to tell a story without dialog took much thought and experiments to perfect. A new form of attaching meaning to images presented to an audience began to took shape: The Montage.
 
Lev Kuleshov was the first to experiment in this technique using juxtaposition to form his examples. It involves assembling specific shots and connecting an emotion to it. 
 
Basically, an actor doesn't need to do anything. The film maker will use and expression on a face and then cut to another image to express a specific meaning.
 
Lev-Kuleshovs-effect.jpg
Alfred Hitchcock explained it best. 
 
introduction-to-film-editing-5-638.jpg
 
Kuleshov’s Effect: The Man behind Soviet Montage
 
It was in 1918 that Lev Kuleshov—film theorist, father of the Soviet Montage school of cinema, director of The Extraordinary Adventures of Mr. West in the Land of the Bolsheviks (1924), political partisan, teacher—ventured a hypothesis. The hypothesis: the dramatic effect of a film was found not in the content of its shots but rather in the edits that join them together.
 
Kuleshov put his hypothesis to the test. Taking an expressionless long shot of the actor Ivan Mozzhukhin peering into the camera—presumably, because footage of the original experiment has been lost— he broke it into three parts. Then he intercut each practically-identical segment with three other shots—a bowl of steaming soup, an attractive young woman, and a child lying dead in a coffin. When he showed the segments to audiences and polled their reactions, they swore that Mozzhukhin’s expression had changed from piece to piece. When staring at the soup, Mozzhukhin was hungry; at the young woman, lustful; at the child, mournful.
 
Kuleshov tended to exaggerate the implications of these constructs: “it was not important how the shots were taken, but how these shots were assembled.” Alfred Hitchcock, decades apart and worlds away, called it “pure cinema,” when the montage gives rise to meanings that exist nowhere to the eye, but only in the mind. This interplay between montage, perception, and meaning has come to be known as the “Kuleshov Effect.”
 
 
The Five Editing Methods of Sergei Eisenstein
 
The first and most basic is metric editing, based on the length of a shot. It creates the tempo of the film.
 
The second editing method is rhythmic montage, based on both the length of a shot and the dynamics of the scenes. In other words, it also considers the rhythm of the action depicted.
 
Next is the tonal editing method, which focuses on the lighting, shadows, and colors of the edited scenes.
 
The over-tonal method combines the first three method in a holistic approach.
 
The last and most complex editing method, and Eisenstein’s favorite, is the intellectual method. It creates new meaning through editing by combining shots on the basis of a conceptual connection between them.
 
 
Building on the works of D.W. Griffith and the development of “continuity editing” in early film history, Soviet silent filmmakers would pioneer new innovative ideas about editing that moved film from an extension of theater into a mature and powerful artistic medium.
 
 
Going through the history of these magic light effects helps to understand where psychological priming comes from. Especially using imagery to create emotion into an audience. Today, the internet is able to encourage these effects with greater influence and ability.

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#28 Feathers

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 03:04 PM

Good articles on montage...
 
Before motion pictures came along people were enchanted by magical lantern lights...
 

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#29 status - Silent Sounds

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 03:56 PM

There's an interesting correlation to montage using scenes with spoken dialog.  Specifically, timber and tone; using different inflections when uttering words adds to the impact. These effects are difficult to describe in words alone. Using a montage can convey the same kind of 'auditory' type of visual in the mind.
 
Check out this example:
 
 

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#30 status - Guest

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 06:56 PM

 

Good articles on montage...
 
Before motion pictures came along people were enchanted by magical lantern lights...
 

 

 

This too...

 

http://forum.chicken...-circus/?p=8805


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