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Improve Your Memory with Mnemonic Devices

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#1 Ludikrus

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 11:43 AM

Do you have problems with memory retention and recall? Memory can be tricky. Many times leading questions and other mind tricks can get people to believe in 'false memories'. These can be used against you. Practicing mnemonics may help mitigate false memories by helping you with techniques to help recall good information.

'Mnemonic' is another word for memory tool. Mnemonics are techniques for remembering information that is otherwise quite difficult to recall: A very simple example is the '30 days hath September' rhyme for remembering the number of days in each calendar month.

The idea behind using mnemonics is to encode difficult-to-remember information in a way that is much easier to remember.

https://www.mindtools.com/memory.html

knuckles-months.png

Many types of mnemonics exist and which type works best is limited only by the imagination of each individual learner. The 9 basic types of mnemonics presented in this handout include Music, Name, Expression/Word, Model, Ode/Rhyme, Note Organization, Image, Connection, and Spelling Mnemonics.

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Here's a link to a pdf document on different forms of mnemonic devices.

http://www.regent.ed...kills_index.pdf

Why are mnemonic memory devices so important?

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http://www.learninga.../mnemonics.html

 

This video gives the gist of some simple techniques to try for yourself.

 

Acronyms make great devices, too!



 

 

mnemonicImages.jpg

 

 


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#2 MrChips

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 01:32 PM

Nice thread idea, Ludikrus!

 

:dancing-hatching-chicken-smiley

 

Their may be evidence found in connection with a theory regarding the use of icons to attach mnemonic story telling devices for the earliest versions of the bible....

 


“The Jews of Bible times, in common with many of the peoples of antiquity, transmitted much of their law and literature not only through writing but also through the memory of generation after generation. It was frequently after the lapse of many years, and only when there was danger of their being forgotten, that tales centuries old were written down. At first it was not the whole story or speech that was written down, but enough to refresh the memory . . . In the latest books of the Bible, however, the stories and narratives are recorded in great detail, indicating that literary composition had replaced oral transmission . . . The chief need for aids to the memory . . . arose in the Amoraic period, when the mass of oral tradition became a veritable ‘sea of the Talmud.’ For this purpose various indicators were employed known as simmanim, or ‘signs’ (singular, simman). The Babylonian teachers laid especial emphasis on such aids to the memory and held that the knowledge of the Torah had been better preserved in Judea than in Galilee because the students of the former country paid attention to such signs and those of the latter did not. Such aids to memory occur often in the Babylonian Talmud. They usually consist of short sentences or abbreviations. The sentences may be verses from the Bible, proverbs, or, less frequently, well-known names; the abbreviations are made by combining the initial letters of various words that go to make up the essence of the passage to be remembered.”

 

http://ancientameric...DITIONS.htm?n=0

There are also connections to early oral histories retained mnemonically in many African Tribes. Alex Haley discovered this when researching his landmark book 'Roots'. Finding written records of his family history was possible until he went to Africa to research his ancestors there. He found no written histories. Just oral ones.

 

:bumpsmall:


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Good Morning!

 

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 01:36 PM

The rhythms and melodies in music certainly help in remembering lyrics to old songs I've heard in the past. Meter and rhyme, I believe, are useful techniques to memorize things.

 

:Beer:

 


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#4 Ludikrus

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 01:48 PM

The rhythms and melodies in music certainly help in remembering lyrics to old songs I've heard in the past. Meter and rhyme, I believe, are useful techniques to memorize things.

 

:Beer:

 

:falling_leaves3:

 

Yes, sometimes they stick like ear worms....

 

 

:cokesmiley:


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#5 status - Guest

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 04:59 PM

This article simply explains memory devices such as acronyms, chunking and organization techniques, imagery, etc.
 
From there it's possible to get creative with these simple forms and really go to town in building more complex structures.
 
 
Takes time to learn but in the long run...it's worth it!

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#6 DoctorDoolittle

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 06:15 AM

Flashbulb memories are kind of mnemonic. They are long term memories of high emotional value. Very vivid in content. These kinds of memories seem to grow in confidence over time. Is it possible to use this like a camera and take 'snapshots' of positive (never mind the negative, the media provides enough of that trash everyday to fill the moon) emotional value and fill them with details to include in the mnemonic growth of a good memory? To consciously look for high valued content to re-enforce our mind and hearts with positive growth? 
 
Look to the positive and take flashbulb memories of them..........
 
:candleflame:

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#7 Feathers

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 08:58 AM

:Pick_Me:

 

 

A good vocabulary mnemonic is by grouping synonyms of words together. Build on that and include their antonyms.


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#8 Jesse Jimmie

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 12:19 PM

:Pick_Me:

 

 

A good vocabulary mnemonic is by grouping synonyms of words together. Build on that and include their antonyms.

 

Vocabulary. I'm glad you brought that one up. All I remember from the classroom environment is memorizing words in alphabetical order. Definitions and spelling. Lot of good it did me. I forgot most of what they taught me in those days. Chunking synonyms together would have made it easier to remember definitions.


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To Cluck or not to Cluck, that is the question...


#9 Feathers

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 12:46 PM

Vocabulary. I'm glad you brought that one up. All I remember from the classroom environment is memorizing words in alphabetical order. Definitions and spelling. Lot of good it did me. I forgot most of what they taught me in those days. Chunking synonyms together would have made it easier to remember definitions.

 

I'm glad you mentioned that. I learned about these vocabulary techniques in college. Not in elementary or high school. It would have been better for me in the long run if I did learn these things at a much younger age.
 
 

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#10 Jesse Jimmie

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 12:49 PM

 

I'm glad you mentioned that. I learned about these vocabulary techniques in college. Not in elementary or high school. It would have been better for me in the long run if I did learn these things at a much younger age.
 
 

 

 

That's a bump!

 

:bumpsmall:

 

I'll check it out later. I can always improve my own vocab!

 

:dancing-hatching-chicken-smiley


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To Cluck or not to Cluck, that is the question...




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