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How to make sense of conspiracy theories


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#21 Feathers

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 04:11 PM

Drawing maps helps to make conspiracies more solid!

 

https://i.pinimg.com...-comic-book.jpg

 

:chuckle:

 

:funny-chicken-dancing:

 

Maps!?

 

I think we got a thread relating to maps. Some are fun, others are interesting, even a few stupid ones:

 

Maps They Didn’t Teach You In School

 

http://forum.chicken...-you-in-school/


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#22 Riddikulus

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 12:42 PM

Do banana trees count?

 

GMZRdJU.gif

 

Oh yes, they count. Look up the Banana Wars. This goes back to the early 20th century economic wars between corporate interests in the United States and those down in South America.


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#23 status - Legos

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 02:33 PM

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#24 status - Pop Vulture

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 02:46 PM

Conventional wisdom puts the beginning of modern conspiracy-theory culture at the JFK assassination. But it probably makes more sense to think of it evolving in its aftermath, in the years following the shooting, once the shock wore off. In the late 1960s, that is, which just so happen to be the years when the country radically polarized along the political lines we now know so oppressively well. The assassination wasn’t just a chaotic, spectacular, improbable event that Americans desperately wanted explained, even if the explanations were terrifying (conspiracy-theory culture being essentially willed into being by those for whom nothing was more terrifying than randomness and meaninglessness). It was also the locus of an ideological battlefield over who were the heroes and who the real villains in American life: pro-Castro and anti-Castro leftists; Russian operatives; the CIA; LBJ; the Mafia; the Camelot Kennedys — the list goes on. We floated conspiracy theories, in other words, as a way of projecting politics.
 
While there were both political and pop-culture conspiracy theories in the 1960s and 1970s — Elvis is still alive, you may have heard — conspiracism as a phenomenon didn’t come into full flower until the 1990s. That was thanks to the internet. Message boards and chat rooms of that era gave us the golden age of political conspiracy theory, which we are still living in. They were also the birthplace of pop-culture paranoia — when doubts about the real identities of singers and actors, whether they had actually died or truly written that particular song, gave rise to real debate and “forensic” scrutiny. (Is Stevie Wonder really blind? We’ll have to consider the relevant video … ) These days, pop-culture obsessives are quick to cook up conspiracies anytime a celebrity dies, changes her appearance, or even stands next to a triangle, and ideas can now be passed from the edges of sanity to your Facebook feed in a matter of minutes, converting more of the easily influenced into paranoid believers. Not to say that pop-culture conspiracies live only in the present — they are often most delicious when they reach back in time, even way back in time, to propose we consider, say, whether it was George Lucas who actually directed Return of the Jedi (which was, you have to admit, worse than Empire) or whether it was actually Emily Brontë’s brother who wrote Wuthering Heights (exhibit A: fucking Heathcliff!).
 
Vulture has spent the past few months undertaking an exhaustive cataloguing of these conspiracy theories of pop culture. Music, film, literature, TV, and anything else a celebrity might touch are organized by “genre” (do you like reading about zombie pop stars or Illuminati Svengalis or secret authors of famous books?) and presented pure — that is, not as investigative claims but conspiracy theories. And as a sort of “review of the literature,” the “data” below do contain some lessons and insights. We did, in other words, learn some things!
 
First, that when viewed from a certain perspective, pop-culture conspiracy theory is the phenomenon in its purest form — paranoia without ideology, or anyway without partisanship. And what you get when you peel back the partisanship, it turns out, are pure theories of power. Why would Beyoncé and Jay Z lie about the birth of Blue Ivy? It’s hard to come up with a motive better than “Because they could.” The most common theory amounts to the same thing — that it has something to do with their being Illuminati and the presumably paranoid logic of any self-perpetuating elite.
 
Second, pop conspiracies have changed over time. It used to be, at least in the pre-internet era, that people were most suspicious about post-facto cover-ups. Who really killed Natalie Wood, or Bob Marley, or Albert Camus? Especially delectable were those theories about people who hadn’t, as far as the public knew, actually died, but whom the paranoid suspected had in fact died, probably quite suddenly, only to be haphazardly “replaced” by the people around him or her who didn’t want to lose their cash-flow source. (Consider, for instance, “Paul is dead.”) This subcategory of conspiracy theory suggested a particular worldview: Stars were special people with special skills who had won special attention from the public that could nevertheless be maintained by special post-death stagecraft.
 
In the boy-band and corporate-Hollywood 1990s, though, the famous started to seem a lot less special, and contemporary conspiracy theory followed suit. This is the era of the Illuminati worldview — that everyone who is famous, or close to everyone, owes that fame to the power of a secret cabal. It is also when the theory arose that gangster rap was concocted by the private prison industry. Later, we’d “learn” that Britney Spears was a tool of the Bush administration, Katy Perry was really grown-up JonBenét Ramsey, and J.K. Rowling was just an actress impersonating an author. The meta-level lesson of all these theories is that the whole system of celebrity, which may confuse or madden you as a consumer of culture, makes sense — that the arbitrariness of, say, Miley Cyrus’s rise to fame could be explained by the influence of secret power brokers (rather than talent or popular taste). In fact, when you add the Illuminati, the arbitrariness of somebody’s success becomes a kind of circular-logic explanation for it (how else could Andrew W.K. have made it?).
 
And then there is perhaps the most interesting new-model conspiracy — most interesting because the category often includes the most plausible claims. These are about authorship, and credit — that Bob Dylan stole “Blowin’ in the Wind” from a New Jersey high-school student, say, or that Paul Thomas Anderson actually directed A Prairie Home Companion. These may seem, at first, old news and old-fashioned conspiracy theorizing. And in ways they are — people have been arguing about who wrote Shakespeare’s plays literally for centuries, of course. But those arguments about secret authorship are also artifacts of the present and recent past, since until quite recently (and excepting real outlier cases like Shakespeare), it simply wasn’t the case that debates about artistic credit became matters of genuine paranoia (as opposed to just, well, debates about credit). You don’t argue about who “really” wrote the classic songs of the Delta blues, for instance, and probably wouldn’t argue about whether someone other than Francis Ford Coppola was behind the movies he directed in the auteur era of 1970s Hollywood. But pop culture is confused these days about authorship, wanting to elevate “geniuses” but also litigate credit (which often amounts to royalty payments) and apportion responsibility between, say, the eight or ten producers who worked on a particular pop song, or the six screenwriters who labored over versions of a script, or between the showrunners whose names appear below television shows almost like bylines and the writers’ rooms responsible for the words their characters actually speak. In that kind of environment, second-guessing official stories isn’t just natural, it’s inevitable. Which means, we think, you should be able to argue about everything on this list — from whether Nicki Minaj is just sped-up Jay Z (you’ll notice a gendered component to a lot of these theories) to whether Avril Lavigne actually died in 2003.
 
Before you start, though, one last note on methodology: We considered something a conspiracy theory if it alleges the covering up of an official story. Unlike political conspiracies, the motives here aren’t necessarily devious, although there’s plenty of that. Choosing what made the cut was not a scientific process. We looked for theories that have a following of more than one and those that have been offered in earnest. That is to say, someone somewhere believes each of these. You might be one of them. And you might be right.
 
 
 

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#25 status - Keyholes

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 02:57 PM

Like The Da Vinci Code?
 
Try These 9 Weird Conspiracy Theories About Art
 
512px-Michelangelo_-_Creation_of_Adam.jp
 
- Michelangelo immortalised Mary Magdalene in marble, not the Virgin Mary
Michelangelo also thumbed his nose at the church – in the Sistine Chapel
British artist Walter Sickert was Jack the Ripper – and he painted scenes of his murders
The Mona Lisa contains a hidden code in her eyes
The Last Supper hides a musical secret
Rembrandt and Vermeer traced their masterpieces
Francisco Goya didn’t paint his infamous Black paintings
A painting of Elizabethan magician John Dee had skulls removed
Vincent Van Gogh may have created his own homage to The Last Supper.
 
Do you know any other artistic conspiracy theories?
 

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#26 status - Digger

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 03:41 PM

Top 100 Conspiracy Theories of All Time
 
History is laced with conspiracy theories. Some of them turn out to be true, some turn out to have elements of truth and others are completely false. Truth Control has assembled a list of the most outrageous and thought provoking conspiracies you will ever hear.
 
Adolf Hitler Fakes Death
Mystery Man at Signing of Declaration of Independence
Montauk Project
Barack Obama Citizenship
Iraq War / WMD
Civilization on Mars
Birth Certificate Is A Traded Security
Moses was Akhenaten
Atmosphere on the Moon
Count of St. Germain
Majestic-12
John Titor Time Traveler
Nero Burns Rome
Watergate Scandal
Bermuda Triangle
Cell Phones
Cold War Was Staged Event
Mafia
Face on Mars
Philadelphia Experiment
United States Corporation
Treaty of 1213
America Discovered Before Columbus
Nazis Backed By Vatican
Francis Bacon Was Shakespeare
Inside of Earth Is Hollow
President Eisenhower Treaty With Aliens
Martin Luther King Jr. Assassination
Democracy
Asteroid Belt
Banco Ambrosiano Collapse
Manhattan Project
Hitler Burns Down Reichstag
Great Seal of United States
Ancient Texts In Vatican Library
Knights Templar
Nibiru / Planet X
Aryan Master Race
Underground Tunnels and Bases
Hollywood's Influence
HAARP Weather Manipulation
Jesus Never Existed
Vatican Is Satanic
Atlantis
Jesus Married To Mary Magdeline
Bigfoot
Denver Airport
Great Pyramid / Sphinx
Puppet Dictators
Skull & Bones
American Civil War Started By Britain
AIDS Created In Lab
Peak Oil
Feminism
Income Tax Is Not A Law
Knights of Malta
Oklahoma City Bombing
Project MKULTRA
Russian Revolution Created By America and Britain
Eugenics
Abraham Lincoln Assassination
Environmentalism
Depopulation
Bohemian Grove
Jesuits Tied To Illuminati
Crop Circles
Pearl Harbor Was Allowed To Occur
FEMA Camps
CIA Drug Trafficking
Chemtrails
Operation Paperclip
Princess Diana Murdered by British Royal Family
Operation Northwoods
Fluoride In The Water
RFID
Flu Shots / Vaccinations
Man-Made Global Warming
Big Pharma
NASA
Intelligence Agencies
3 World Wars Planned Years In Advance
Area 51
Jewish World Domination / Zionism
Moon Landing Was Faked
Roswell UFO Crash
Bilderberg Group
Mainstream Media Propaganda
Deliberate Dumbing Down of Education
Freemasonry
Alternative Energy / Tesla Suppression
Shadow Government
Organized Religion
Reptilians Rule The World
JFK Assassination
Alien Abductions
Federal Reserve Created For Economic Terrorism
Illuminati Rule The World
9/11 Was A False Flag
Ancient Astronauts
New World Order
 
 
 

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 03:52 PM

You forgot Flat Earth, Antarctica, Mandela effect, Tavistock...

 

:Grin9: 


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#28 status - Guest

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 04:24 PM

There is a good reason why secret societies are secret, and it often has little to do with cults, devil worship or the abuse of power; one notable exception is the Skull And Bones Society in New Haven, Connecticut, which has given us such illustrious alumni as George Bush Senior and Junior, and Dick Cheney, but more on that later.
 
The ‘secret’ in secret esoteric societies lies in the fact that they were adepts of Ancient Mysteries schools; ‘mystery’ stems from the Greek musterion, and the root muo, meaning ‘silent, to close one’s mouth’. These schools, often housed in temples from Persia to Ireland, were curators of the laws that drive the Universe— not moral laws but codes of creation that govern matter. One of the principal aims of secret teachings has sought to reform the material world by implementing the laws of the heavens so as to positively direct and influence the otherwise chaotic human life. It has been the belief of practically every esoteric society that over-attachment to the physical world leads to all imbalance; when one becomes embroiled in such a mental state they lose their connection to the divine. This descent from the Universal order becomes the root of the pain we experience.
 
If a divine order can be applied to the land then it is possible for entire civilizations to live in balance for generations. When properly harnessed it can even empower people to be very effective co-creators, where manifestation of desires becomes as second-nature as driving a car. Naturally such information can be very powerful. It stands to reason that that kind of power vested in the wrong hands is a very dangerous toy. History provides us time and again with enough despots, mad scientists and intolerant religious zealots to prove this point. When powerful organizations such as the Roman Catholic Church learn of such secrets, they want them bad. It is well documented how the Church carried out a holocaust against ‘heretical’ groups as a tantrum for failing to gain access to they secrets, or to control it whenever and wherever it was taught. (A heretic means ‘one who is able to choose’).
 
Since most of these Orders were massacred to a man, common sense decreed that any Society involved with the promotion of supposed ‘heretical’ systems of knowledge should remain invisible. But in the minds of the paranoid and the suspicious, any group of people who remain outside the boundaries of society suggests they are indulging in all manner of acts that are used for nefarious purposes. And so from time to time secret societies have come under scrutiny from people who know nothing of their work. But from time to time, the practice of Hermetic secrets have emerged from within the courts of more enlightened European rulers. 
 
Skeptics of secret societies tend to scoff at the notion that all teachings protected by some mysterious secret not accessible to all possess any supernatural benefits; as proof they point a finger at the continuous sad state the world always finds itself in despite the claim that ancient secrets have been used to save it. A quick glance at any newspaper today would suggest they have a sound argument; then again one can counter-argue that humanity would be in a much worse state of prehistoric barbarity were it not for the efforts of a select few adepts who’ve been continuously implementing some stabilizing influence upon the face of the Earth. But it can equally be argued that if secret societies are no more than snake-oil peddlers then why should institutions such as the Catholic church have bothered to squander men and money to annihilate millions of people whom they branded as heretics? Why the trumped-up charges against secret Orders such as the Knights Templars? The truth probably lies in the nature of the individual to be able to choose the direction in life, because for all the esoteric teachings there will always be people for whom such higher knowledge has no practical value.
 
Then again, there are those bullies that will infiltrate secret societies and use their knowledge for truly nefarious purposes. The attainment of ‘occult’ rituals and the securing of ancient places of power has a top priority for despots such as William the Conqueror, Julius Caesar, and the hierarchy of the Third Reich. And perhaps it is still the case today for politicians of supposedly democratically-elected governments. Much has been written about the alleged involvement of Freemasons in the events that brought terrorism to New York on September 11, 2001. Much of it is pure lunacy; but some bears scrutiny because there exist Freemasonic orders with access to some ancient arts who control it for the advancement of an elite few.
 

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#29 Feathers

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 12:50 PM

You forgot Flat Earth, Antarctica, Mandela effect, Tavistock...

 

:Grin9: 

 

The list goes on and on...


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Posted 22 October 2017 - 12:17 PM

Conspiracy theory!
 
Identify it, define it:
 
What is a corporation?
 
A group of people on board a plan to make profit, power, and prestige the main focus of an endeavor. Competing with other groups for dominance in the market of possibilities. Furthering a goal to push an agenda forward.
 
Doesn't really have to be secret to be a conspiracy. 
 
Doesn't have to be such a bad thing either. 
 
Joining together in social groups is a form of conspiracy. 
 
How many conspire together as volunteers at a social function?
 
Takes planning and logistics to keep a good conspiracy running smoothly.
 
Too much negativity has been injected into the term 'conspiracy theory'
 
Makes the mainliners cringe whenever it's heard...
 
:chuckle:
 

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