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Gardening, Herbs, Oils, and Medicine

Herbs medicine gardening

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#11 Red

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Posted 07 November 2015 - 02:30 PM

There is also folklore and stories behind herbs...

 

Watch out for the garden sprites! 

 

:butterfly:

 

Basil - Brings harmony in the home

Bay Laurel - Attract prosperity

Fennel - symbol of courage

Oregano - A symbol of joy

Yarrow - Protect the home

Elder - Keep Evil Spirits away

Vervain - The Sacred Herb

 

:rose:


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#12 status - Roadrunner

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Posted 07 November 2015 - 05:30 PM

Herbs and Spices for Culinary Uses - Thanksgiving is coming up.  
Check out these herbs for adding some spice to your feast this year.
 
Angelica 
A sweat treat
 
Chicory 
Coffee Substitute
 
Fennel  
Good with white fish or pork
 
Lemon Balm  
Cook with spinach, chicken, white fish or pork
 
Burdock 
Good in soups and stews
 
Marigold  
use with egg or cheese
 
Saffron  
Very expensive!
 
 
:)
 

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#13 status - Guest

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 11:14 AM

 
Orange peels can be used for many things around the house, in the kitchen, and in the medicine cabinet, and they have purposes as varied as dessert garnish, insect repellant, and skin pore cleanser. During the earliest days of orange cultivation, peels were often more prized than the fruit they protected due in large part to the essential oils they contain. These oils were used as a topical skin treatment, as a malady for indigestion, and as an additive in many different foods.
 
Cooks during the Middle Ages were more likely to use dried peels as seasonings than they were to serve the fruit or the juice. Most scholars speculate that it wasn't until sweet oranges were introduced in Spain and Italy that the rest of the orange received much recognition as a food in its own right. Even today, there are perhaps more uses for orange peels and the oils they contain than there are for the rest of the fruit.

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#14 status - Green Thumb

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 12:40 PM

A site on tips and features on growing your own food gardens.  Learning to do these things and making habits to keep them all growing is a good thing economically.  
 
Food Gardening Guide
 
The source for information on growing your favorite vegetables, fruits, and herbs.
 
Whether you're growing basil, blueberries, or bok choy, the Food Gardening Guide will give you all the information you need to succeed. Plus, we'll feature a vegetable, fruit, or herb monthly on this page with seasonal articles about that plant. 
 
 
 

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#15 status - Guest

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 09:04 PM

This is a great idea when you have to leave your herb gardens unattended for a little while.

 

Make Plants Water Themselves - Upcycling for Cheapo Winos!

 

How to make Cheapo Wino Plant Bottles
 

 

fillwithwater-225x300.jpg  invert2-225x300.jpg

 

:falling_leaves3:

 

 

 

 


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#16 status - Br'er Fox

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 03:14 PM

Vitamin B17: The Greatest Cover-Up In The History Of Cancer

http://30c1be84fhhqj.../1480402934.jpg

Question:“If B17 is so powerful and helpful towards cancer elimination then why is it not prescribed by modern Physicians as a treatment?”

Simple Answer:“A control for cancer is known, and it comes from nature, but it is not widely available to the public because it cannot be patented, and therefore is not commercially attractive to the pharmaceutical industry.”
 — G. Edward Griffin.

http://reset.me/stor...tory-of-cancer/
 

Fruits  Range* blackberry, domestic low blackberry, wild high boysenberry med. choke cherry high wild crabapple high market cranberry low Swedish (lignon) cranberry high currant med. elderberry med. to high gooseberry. med. huckleberry med. loganberry med. mulberry med. quince med. raspberry med.

 

Seeds  Range* apple seeds high apricot seed high buckwheat med. cherry seed high flax med. millet med. nectarine seed high peach seed high pear seeds high plum seed high prune seed high squash seeds med.

 

Beans  Range* black low black-eyed peas low fava high garbanzo low to med. green pea low kidney low to med. lentils med. lima, U.S.  low lima, Burma med. mung med. to high shell low

 

Nuts (all raw)  Range* bitter almond high cashew low macadamia med. to high

 

Sprouts  Range* alfalfa med. bamboo high fava med. garbanzo med. mung med.

 


Leaves  Range* alfalfa high beet tops low eucalyptus high spinach low water cress low

 



Tubers  Range* cassava high sweet potato low yams low

http://www.vitaminb17.org/foods.htm

 

:)

 


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#17 Jesse Jimmie

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 10:42 AM

How To Brew Chicken Poop (or Horse Manure) Fertilizer Tea for your Garden

If you garden and raise chickens, you can forget about having to buy Miracle Gro or fertilizer ever again. It's so easy to make this Chicken Poop Tea to fertilize your gardens!

We use the Deep Litter Method of overwintering the coop bedding, which is an old-timer's method of composting the chicken manure all winter right in your coop. Then in the spring, you just clean it all out and add it to your compost pile. We also compost our horse manure, so when its time to prepare my vegetable garden, I have piles of composted soil at my disposal.

But this year I decided to step it up a bit and brew a batch of manure tea to help add more nutrients to our garden soil. I've been preparing the garden for planting for the last week or so, and it's a perfect time to give the soil a drink of nutrient-rich tea.

 

http://www.fresheggs...p-or-horse.html

20140220_073856.jpg
 

The stench of a those LARGE chicken farms can be smelled for miles and miles around!  Ever take a wiff of that high octane methane from those factory produced poultry farms?

:dancingchicken: :vomitsmiles: :turkey:

 

Turkey, too!

 

Happy Thanksgiving, everybody!

 

:)

 

 

 


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To Cluck or not to Cluck, that is the question...


#18 Ludikrus

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 01:30 PM

Horseshit and worms on the agenda today?

 

:fry_mooning:

 

:P

 

How to Build a Worm Farm

 

Worm FarmsVermicomposting (from the Latin word vermis meaning worm) is an efficient and effective method for turning kitchen waste into a rich compost. Some of the benefits of keeping a worm farm include:

    Recycling kitchen food waste,
    Reducing waste,
    Having a ready supply of fishing worms, and
    Producing soil amendments and/or fertilizer for garden plants.

http://www.mde.maryl...ation/worm.aspx


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#19 Quartus

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Posted 20 November 2015 - 09:33 PM

This thread is starting to look really useful!  Thank you.  I've found some of the information useful.

 

Oranges have all kinds of benefits!  Cut a branch from an orange tree and use some rooting agent and plant a new tree.  Spread them far and wide.  This can be done with plums, apples, etc.

What are Some Uses for Orange Peels?

Orange peels can be used for many things around the house, in the kitchen, and in the medicine cabinet, and they have purposes as varied as dessert garnish, insect repellant, and skin pore cleanser. During the earliest days of orange cultivation, peels were often more prized than the fruit they protected due in large part to the essential oils they contain. These oils were used as a topical skin treatment, as a malady for indigestion, and as an additive in many different foods.
 


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#20 status - Guest

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 01:33 PM

:)
 
 

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