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Posted 16 October 2016 - 10:16 PM


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#12 Quartus

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 05:57 PM

The Shadow knows....perhaps it is even helping you dig deeper into your psyche. The problem is the continued temptations provided to keep consumers gobbling up things that in the end they know are bad for them. Addiction follows.......

 

It's all in the hypnotic effects...

 

Video Game Hypnotism Insanity
 
Learn how Derren uses NLP and Hypnosis! Some of these are very easy concepts to learn... the rest you may need to take a course or two and practice...AMAZING! FUN!
 
 
 

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#13 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 03:42 PM

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#14 Digger

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 04:34 PM

Video games where people matter? The strange future of emotional AI 
 
Some of the most interesting advances, however, have come from the independent sector, often fuelled by university research into AI concepts such as neural networks, machine learning and natural language processing. The 2005 game Facade by Michael Mateas and Andrew Stern, for example, is an interactive domestic drama featuring a couple named Grace and Trip who are in the midst of an argument that may end their relationship. Taking on the role of a mutual friend, the player is able to talk to the couple using text inputs, making suggestions that the AI characters are able to process and understand via a range of interconnected AI technologies. These include a language processing system, which recognises the words the player uses and interprets the context, a behaviour engine that Mateas and Stern called A Behaviour Language (ABL) that controls the actions and movements of the characters, and a drama manager, which creates interesting beats and moments of tension in the emerging narrative.
 
“It’s amazing, the scarcity of satisfying interactive experiences that are actually about people’s lives – subject matter that is, of course, the heart of the best literature, cinema, theatre and television,” said Stern at the time. “We gave Grace and Trip a wealth of problems and hidden motivations leading to the present moment, carefully balanced between them.” 
 
The resulting scenes don’t always work – they can be stilted and strange, the AI system struggling to understand the nuances of human relationships – but there are moments of emotional intensity in each playthrough, the computer-controlled couple struggling to keep their relationship alive. It was a fascinating experiment.
 
Importantly, the mix of dynamic social AI systems and scene templates led to an array of convincing procedural behaviours that usually made sense. “One of the most delightful parts of development for me was seeing the system start to perform the characters correctly, even without having any dialogue written for a specific student,” says Reed. “As the game came together, we would start to see emergent story moments that no one had specifically written, but were inevitable consequences of the social rules and cast of characters we’d created. It was a bit like watching trained actors start venturing into improv, and coming up with wonderful scenes on their own that were true to their character and appropriate to the play.”
 

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#15 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 12:53 PM

Shall we play a game?: The rise of the military-entertainment complex
 
The Army wants you to play video games: For decades, the military has been financing, inventing and perfecting them 
 
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The roots of the military’s historical involvement with video games extend beyond its sponsorship of computers. For several decades — from the 1960s to the early 1990s — the armed forces took the lead in financing, sponsoring, and inventing the specific technology used in video games. Without the largesse of such military agencies as DARPA, the technological foundation on which the commercial game industry rests would not exist. Advanced computing systems, computer graphics, the Internet, multiplayer networked systems, the 3-D navigation of virtual environments—all these were funded by the Department of Defense.
 
The military’s specific interest in computer-based war gaming can be traced to the late 1970s, when the Army War College introduced the board game Mech War into its staff officer training curriculum. Much more common during this period, however, was the development of high-end computer simulations, not games, for military training. In the 1980s, collaborators from the military, the entertainment industry, and academia began building “distributed interactive simulations” (DIS) — simulations that use distributed software or hardware to create virtual theaters of war, in which participants could interact in real time. These simulations employed the latest advances in computer graphics and virtual-reality technology, which added to the immersive qualities of their synthetic environments. As DIS technology continued to evolve into the next decade, an increasing focus on content and on compelling narratives brought these simulations closer in basic form to commercial video games.
 
The military’s interest in the kinds of video games popular today dates to 1980, when Atari released its groundbreaking Battlezone. Not only did Battlezone evoke a three-dimensional world, as opposed to the two-dimensional worlds of such previous arcade hits as Asteroids and Tempest, but players viewed the action from a first-person perspective, as if they themselves were tank gunners peering through their periscopes at the battlefield outside — in this case, a spare moonscape with mountains and an erupting volcano in the distance. This first-person element made Battlezone a direct ancestor of today’s enormously popular first-person shooters.
 
Soon after Battlezone took off, the army’s Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) requested Atari’s help in building a modified version of the game that could be used as a training device for the then-new Bradley infantry fighting vehicle. General Donn Starry, the head of TRADOC at the time, had recognized early on that soldiers would be more responsive to electronic training methods than to print-and lecture-based ones. “[Today’s soldiers have] learned to learn in a different world,” Starry told a TRADOC commanders’ conference in 1981, “a world of television, electronic toys and games, computers, and a host of other electronic devices. They belong to a TV and technology generation . . . [so] how is it that our soldiers are still sitting in classrooms, still listening to lectures, still depending on books and other paper reading materials, when possibly new and better methods have been available for many years?” Yet while Army Battlezone (also known as Bradley Trainer) was eventually produced, the game was never used to train any actual soldiers.
 
By January 1990, the first SIMNET units were finally ready to go. The army stepped in first, buying several hundred units for its Close Combat Tactical Trainer system. SIMNET’s training value became apparent one year later, during the first Gulf War. In the war’s most significant engagement, known as the Battle of 73 Easting, the U.S. 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment destroyed dozens of Iraqi fighting vehicles in just under two hours, while killing or wounding more than six hundred Iraqi soldiers. Because the 2nd Armored Cavalry had prepared for the war by training extensively on SIMNET, the military decided to use the Battle of 73 Easting as a model for future networked training. The goal was to provide a much more rounded experience of battle than simulation had previously allowed for, one that emphasized the stresses and fears, the emotional experience of war, as much as it did the tactical ones. To this end, the SIMNET team assembled reams of data on 73 Easting: extensive interviews with 150 participants, radio and tape recordings from the battle, overhead photographs of the skirmishing, action logs, even a step-by-step re-creation on the actual battlefield by soldiers from the 2nd Cavalry. The results of this effort pointed the way toward the future of military training: interactive, immersive, complex, and variable scenarios in which the total experience of war could be brought forth in its digital replication. Because simulation was given much of the credit for the military’s Gulf War success, the postwar period saw DARPA’s SIMNET-related research and development efforts expand significantly.
 
The next major step in the military’s video game history came with the 1993 release of the blockbuster first-person shooter fantasy Doom. According to Timothy Lenoir and Henry Lowood, historians of science, Doom is solely responsible for changing practically every facet of PC-based gaming, including “graphics and networking technology, . . . styles of play, notions of authorship, and public scrutiny of game content.” (One of the game’s innovations was a new mode of play called “death match,” which, like Doom’s other innovations, is now a standard feature of many first-person shooter games.) Doom was an immediate sensation among gamers, with sales soon climbing into the millions.
 
Around the same time that Doom was released, the Marine Corps Modeling and Simulation Office (MCMSO) received a mandate from the annual General Officers Symposium to begin looking for commercial video games that might prove useful for training. Because the Marine Corps budget is a great deal smaller than that of the other services, the corps has a long history of seeking cost-effective training solutions. General Charles Krulak, its commandant at the time, believed that PC-based war games held great potential for teaching Marines critical decision-making skills.
 

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#16 status - Ender

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 03:28 PM

These changes in operant conditioning have certainly made it easier to kill the 'enemy'. There is an historical precedent to this. The 'El Requiremento': This document gave permission and absolution to the soldiers of the time to kill the 'enemy' without conscience. 

El Requerimiento, meaning "the requirement, or demand," was drafted in 1513 by Juan López de Palacios Rubios, a member of the Council of Castile, which advised King Ferdinand. The document was designed to be read in Spanish by Spanish explorers to American Indians, introducing them to Christian doctrine. Indians were not compelled to convert, but if they did not, they were immediately subject to Spanish invasion. The following English translation is published by Wikipedia.
 

 

 

 


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Posted 20 November 2016 - 03:31 PM

These media devices remind one of the allegory of the cave. We're seeing our modern world through screens of hyper reality. Directed programming through the use of news and movies. Adding ad sense to the world wide web of corporate media gives the machine power to profile personalities and direct our consumer habits. Most of the entertainment is filled with artificial enhances and re-enforced with fallacy based language to confuse emotions and direct public opinion. Like those shadows on the wall of the cave. Giving us all light shows all for the price of one admission. Then the hooks begin....


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Posted 20 November 2016 - 04:11 PM

What's wrong with media and video if it keeps you from being bored?


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Posted 20 November 2016 - 04:23 PM

The military entertainment complex has been woefully misused by the TPTB upon the ignorant. Too much distraction and fallacy prevails upon our senses through these hyper realities. Wars fought by proxy keep the larger nations safe from the bombs. Video screen heaven for gods behind joysticks.

 

 


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Posted 20 November 2016 - 04:33 PM

What's wrong with media and video if it keeps you from being bored?

 

A certain demoralization has occurred desensitizing western society. When crisis occurs it opens the door to normalization. Then a new set of policies can be enacted. These have a way of constricting the growth of the individual. Lowering our education standards and keeping attentions spans diverted from achieving any real meaning. Only from what is seen on the screen. Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss...


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