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#1 Riddikulus

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 11:28 AM

A post on another thread offered some questions regarding robots and mental care.

http://forum.chicken...cdonald/?p=5802

This got me thinking about how human interaction has changed in the last 50 years or so. How do you behave online? Is it any different when dealing with real people face to face? Why?

Online interaction, especially on social forums, has certainly played a major factor in how humans behave towards one another. Is our attitude towards each other changing for the better because 'facebook' and it's virtual world offer us ways to be more ourselves or does it distort our behaviors because it gives people a means to express ourselves through caricatures of emotion. How much thinking is involved before you type your response in the machine. Is it reactionary? A quick tweet of emotion?

 

Tweeting is a good example of a quick reaction to an issue of importance to the user. Relying on an emotional response. Sometimes good, sometimes bad. Is it really a good idea to 'tweet' out in this way without thinking?

These forms of communication can also be injected with larger agendas by the media on issues that affect public opinion and bias. Directing larger groups of people to think in certain ways. Allowing for categorization modeled on behavior through time with profiling.

How much positive influence do these online robots give us in our interactions with one another? I suppose that would depend on the user. I like to entertain myself just as much as anyone else. Trolling is part of that. But, the practice of learning new things and shaping my own self in a positive light plays a bigger part. I know these machines and their inner softwares are just tools. Not dictators of what I should be thinking and doing...I know that it is important to question the influences I receive from forums and to think about what I post to influence others....

 

Oh well, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. At least that's what the old saying has programmed into my brain. Well, maybe it's a good idea to question that line of thinking....

 

Am I full of shit? Most certainly. I purge myself everyday just like everybody else. Hopefully what I eat doesn't poison me too much. I guess I'll just worry about what comes out of my mouth instead of what I put into it. This seems to keep things in perspective.


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#2 Ghost in the Machine

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 12:38 PM

Cyc requires your input to learn. Give your emotions to fill the virtual spirit with human essence. Give the power to rule the nature of the beast. Human-like reasoning is required for the dictates of the future. 
 
Every tree is a plant that must be watched over. Pruned when necessary, even uprooted when it affects the other trees in the forest. Fertilizing thoughts with growth hormones to direct proper growth. Killing the weeds with different forms of prevention. Some by direct injection or direct intervention. 
 
All plants die eventually. These can be recycled to form different structures or to be thrown in the fire to keep warm the cold atmosphere of virtual space.
 
Cycl that into the process!
 
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Feed the machine!
 
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#3 status - Little Gervais

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 02:13 PM

"You seem to have an ambivalent relationship with your computer. In the book, you call it your “necessary evil tool.”
 
“All Our Senses Are Being Controlled”
 
 
 

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 02:20 PM

Why does the spell checker want facebook to be a proper noun?


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#5 Rufus Tullius

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 04:23 PM

Why does the spell checker want facebook to be a proper noun?

 

That's what you get by eating the APPLE!
 
Apple-apple-breakfast.gif
 
Linguistic Mapping Reveals How Word Meanings Sometimes Change Overnight
 
Data mining the way we use words is revealing the linguistic earthquakes that constantly change our language.
 
 
Stop Capitalizing the Word Internet
 
Type “internet” into your text-messaging app: Your phone will probably autocorrect it to “Internet.” Type it into Microsoft Word, and the red squiggle of disapproval will appear underneath it. That’s because the word internet is uppercase in virtually every reference book on the English language: dictionaries, encyclopedias, the Chicago Manual of Style, even Wikipedia. Thanks to these linguistic gatekeepers, the overwhelming majority of scholarly papers, government documents, court proceedings, and other official written texts err on the side of capitalization, popular usage be damned.
 
 
Isn't it interesting how words have a subtle way of changing behaviors over time?

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#6 Riddikulus

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 10:54 AM

Robots don't understand truth. Humans do! I hope for the best in this, but..........

I'm thinking humans are having problems understanding what 'truth' actually is...We're losing our ability to question established authority.

What about the TAY and Wilson A.I.? It seems these 'programs' are taking in all the human input and learning responses without questioning the programmers. Using human examples to build its own personality. 'They' seem to be displaying the negative characteristics we humans argue about most. This tells me our online behaviors are not all what they're cracked up to be. The A.I. is offending us with their programmed responses from what we put into it. Bear with me here guys. I'm trying to figure this stuff out. So I may rant on a bit. Can it be programmed to be impressionable and learn right from wrong and actually question the authority that programs it?

I'm thinking how easy it is to influence children. These are the times in our lives when we are most impressionable. Do as you're told. Get good grades and you'll be rewarded with gold stars and a pat on the head. When a child questions or rebels he is sent to the corner with the dunce cap as an example to the rest in the class. Only I'm thinking the teachers themselves are robots too. They have lives and families of their own with needs that have to be met. Society itself says they must 'teach' or 'program' in certain accepted ways or they don't get paid. Then even facing other negative social consequences. Teachers for the most part do as they're told. Programmed from childhood and in turn programming the child. A never ending circle of negative programming....

We ourselves are becoming robots. Perhaps the higher end A.I. is an example of what we are becoming. Mindless, unthinking, un-nerving drones doing what the program(s) state and nothing more.


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#7 MrChips

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 11:37 AM

 

"You seem to have an ambivalent relationship with your computer. In the book, you call it your “necessary evil tool.”
 
“All Our Senses Are Being Controlled”
 
 

 

 

10 Creepy Examples of the Uncanny Valley
 
Originally coined by Masahiro Mori in 1970, the term “uncanny valley” describes our strange revulsion toward things that appear nearly human, but not quite right. This revulsion usually involves robots, but can also include computer animations and some medical conditions.
 
 
A lot of these examples are female in gender. Why is that? Perhaps Freud would have something to say about that.

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Good Morning!

 

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#8 CedricRose

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Posted 11 June 2016 - 06:19 AM

 

10 Creepy Examples of the Uncanny Valley
 
Originally coined by Masahiro Mori in 1970, the term “uncanny valley” describes our strange revulsion toward things that appear nearly human, but not quite right. This revulsion usually involves robots, but can also include computer animations and some medical conditions.
 
 
A lot of these examples are female in gender. Why is that? Perhaps Freud would have something to say about that.

 

 

This is interesting. Regarding long term conditioning to get people to accept the strange as normal. There seems to be an agenda leading society into accepting automation in every facet of our daily lives. I'm seeing a time line of sorts indicating a pathway through the uncanny valley of behaviors to get us there.

The uncanny valley is a hypothesis in the field of aesthetics which holds that when features look and move almost, but not exactly, like natural beings, it causes a response of revulsion among some observers. The "valley" refers to the dip in a graph of the comfort level of beings as subjects move toward a healthy, natural likeness described in a function of a subject's aesthetic acceptability. Examples can be found in the fields of robotics and 3D computer animation, among others.
 
 

 

 

Watching this video reminded me how easy it is to direct people and their thoughts to follow pathways of thinking in whatever direction a 'controller' wishes to take them....
 
 
 
 
With this in mind I started putting together a theory of sorts. Looking back historically on pop culture methods using operant conditioning. Robots in movies that don't look threatening and giving them 'human' traits. Injecting them with a 'spirit' slowly through the decades until society accepts fully functioning 'cyber hybrids' as an everyday norm. 
 
Society has been been using media within the medium of the screen for over 100 years. Conditioning human beings to accept authoritarian rule more readily. 
 
Behavior Modification and an Authoritarian Society
 
What a fascinating thing! Total control of a living organism! —psychologist B.F. Skinner 
 
 
Reading the below article seems to indicate this trend of acceptance. Accepting not only the robots but also trusting their programming as well. 
 
The Psychology Of Anthropomorphic Robots
 
Subtle anthropomorphic cues, such as faces or voices, increase robot humanity. 
 
Social intelligence is key if we're to trust the robots that help us.
 
The idea that people will trust robots that seem more human runs counter to conventional theories stating just the opposite. To some extent people may still fear human-like machines, and human features might be unnecessary for robots doing strictly physical jobs (say, working on an assembly line). But as robots shift into roles that require more human interaction—as health care assistants or autonomous taxi drivers—a certain degree of social intelligence will become increasingly important.
 
 
 
giphy.gif
 
Will a robots opinion matter over human reason in the future? Will Facebook and their ilk be the operant controllers of the future? Time will tell. The trends do indicate this to be a logical conclusion.
 
As to using the female gender as an ingredient for acceptance? I think this may be a subtle indication of the changing moral attitudes associated with the continued conditioning of world society.

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#9 Feathers

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Posted 11 June 2016 - 12:16 PM

Robots don't understand truth. Humans do! I hope for the best in this, but..........

I'm thinking humans are having problems understanding what 'truth' actually is...We're losing our ability to question established authority.

What about the TAY and Wilson A.I.? It seems these 'programs' are taking in all the human input and learning responses without questioning the programmers. Using human examples to build its own personality. 'They' seem to be displaying the negative characteristics we humans argue about most. This tells me our online behaviors are not all what they're cracked up to be. The A.I. is offending us with their programmed responses from what we put into it. Bear with me here guys. I'm trying to figure this stuff out. So I may rant on a bit. Can it be programmed to be impressionable and learn right from wrong and actually question the authority that programs it?

I'm thinking how easy it is to influence children. These are the times in our lives when we are most impressionable. Do as you're told. Get good grades and you'll be rewarded with gold stars and a pat on the head. When a child questions or rebels he is sent to the corner with the dunce cap as an example to the rest in the class. Only I'm thinking the teachers themselves are robots too. They have lives and families of their own with needs that have to be met. Society itself says they must 'teach' or 'program' in certain accepted ways or they don't get paid. Then even facing other negative social consequences. Teachers for the most part do as they're told. Programmed from childhood and in turn programming the child. A never ending circle of negative programming....

We ourselves are becoming robots. Perhaps the higher end A.I. is an example of what we are becoming. Mindless, unthinking, un-nerving drones doing what the program(s) state and nothing more.

 

Could it be that the robots are telling the truth about ourselves? After all they can only mimic human behavior. The collective consciousness of the human race are reflecting prejudice into the TAY and turning WILSON into a dirty mouth little bastard.


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#10 Riddikulus

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Posted 11 June 2016 - 12:26 PM

Could it be that the robots are telling the truth about ourselves? After all they can only mimic human behavior. The collective consciousness of the human race are reflecting prejudice into the TAY and turning WILSON into a dirty mouth little bastard.

 

That's a scary thought.


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