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#51 status - Psychic Friends

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 04:25 PM

Psychic: It's all in the psyche: mind games
 
Bill_Murray.jpg
 
:smiley-laughing024:

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#52 status - #Cornea

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 06:11 PM

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#53 status - Guest

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 04:23 PM

Texting is prevalent behavior. Even talking on the phone isn't done much anymore. Never mind face to face except in the book of faces. Didn't take that long to normalize either. 

 

All the juice facebook has got on everybody.

 

Data profiling to the max...and you never thought it could be used against you? Kinetic wars and cognitive hacking bring all the injections of dopamine into the network of your brain.

Open the doors to perception...

 


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#54 status - Dopey

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Posted 18 July 2018 - 02:32 PM

All the juice facebook has got on everybody.

 

Data profiling to the max...and you never thought it could be used against you? Kinetic wars and cognitive hacking bring all the injections of dopamine into the network of your brain.

Open the doors to perception...

 

This machine thrives on providing bells and whistles of all kinds. Notifications all day and night to keep the pre scripted schedules in line. Easier to modify the weather within a group consciousness. Here a couple click baiters to think about.

Bear in mind, dopamine is a motivator. Lower levels of dopamine makes a rat go for the easy way and less reward. Effort exerts more dopamine therefore providing more reward. Dopamine rushes also cause a massive crash. Always have something in the can after a job well done. So as to feed the need for more...reward!

Let the Serotonin flow! Do you feel down and out? Do you poop out at parties? Do you need any happy peppy elixers to feel important? Do you lash out and play act to get attention. Does your ego expose your ultimate weakness' for all to see?  Well, we have the cure for you...



This stuff can bring your past experiences to the fore and make them work positively for your well being? Take time in the day to reflect on what is really real inside your soul. It can help discern realities and what is imagined.

There is more...always more...

Would you like some chocolate?

sport-pain-endorphin-obese-exercises-exe

Tune in next week for more...

Same Chicken Time...

Same Chicken Channel...

tenor.gif



:cool: :happy: :wink:


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#55 status - Guest

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Posted 18 July 2018 - 02:43 PM

 

Psychic: It's all in the psyche: mind games
 
Bill_Murray.jpg
 
:smiley-laughing024:

 

 

 

:Laughing-rolf: :Laughing-rolf: :Laughing-rolf: :Laughing-rolf: :Laughing-rolf:

 


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#56 status - Wylie Kenichi

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Posted 18 July 2018 - 02:57 PM

:ph34r:

 

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http://forum.chicken...ning-food-porn/

 

:chuckle:

 


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#57 status - Guest

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 09:54 PM

Here's something disturbing...

 

 

 

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The Spinner* (with the asterisk) is “a service that enables you to subconsciously influence a specific person, by controlling the content on the websites he or she usually visits.” Meaning you can hire The Spinner* to hack another person.

It works like this:

    You pay The Spinner* $29. For example, to urge a friend to stop smoking. (That’s the most positive and innocent example the company gives.)
    The Spinner* provides you with an ordinary link you then text to your friend. When that friend clicks on the link, they get a tracking cookie that works as a bulls-eye for The Spinner* to hit with 10 different articles written specifically to influence that friend. He or she “will be strategically bombarded with articles and media tailored to him or her.” Specifically, 180 of these things. Some go in social networks (notably Facebook) while most go into “content discovery platforms” such as Outbrain and Revcontent (best known for those clickbait collections you see appended to publishers’ websites).

The Spinner* is also a hack on journalism, designed like a magic trick to misdirect moral outrage toward The Spinner’s obviously shitty business, and away from the shitty business called adtech, which not only makes The Spinner possible, but pays for most of online journalism as well.

The magician behind The Spinner* is “Elliot Shefler.” Look that name up and you’ll find hundreds of stories. Here are a top few, to which I’ve added some excerpts and notes:


https://blogs.harvar...gory/marketing/

 


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#58 status - Guest

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 08:28 PM

7 Ways to Be Insufferable on Facebook

To examine this a bit, let’s start by discussing the defining characteristics of statuses that are not annoying.

To be unannoying, a Facebook status typically has to be one of two things:

1) Interesting/Informative

2) Funny/Amusing/Entertaining

You know why these are unannoying? Because things in those two categories do something for me, the reader. They make my day a little better.

Ideally, interesting statuses would be fascinating and original (or a link to something that is), and funny ones would be hilarious. But I’ll happily take mildly amusing—at least we’re still dealing with the good guys.

On the other hand, annoying statuses typically reek of one or more of these five motivations:

1) Image Crafting. The author wants to affect the way people think of her.

2) Narcissism. The author’s thoughts, opinions, and life philosophies matter. The author and the author’s life are interesting in and of themselves.

3) Attention Craving. The author wants attention.

4) Jealousy Inducing. The author wants to make people jealous of him or his life.

5) Loneliness. The author is feeling lonely and wants Facebook to make it better. This is the least heinous of the five—but seeing a lonely person acting lonely on Facebook makes me and everyone else sad. So the person is essentially spreading their sadness, and that’s a shitty thing to do, so it’s on the list.

Facebook is infested with these five motivations—other than a few really saintly people, most people I know, myself certainly included, are guilty of at least some of this nonsense here and there. It’s an epidemic.

To lay out the most common types of offenses:
7 Ways to Be Insufferable on Facebook

1) The Brag
1a) The “I’m Living Quite the Life” Brag
1b) The Undercover Brag
1c) The “I’m in a Great Relationship” Brag
2) The Cryptic Cliffhanger
3) The Literal Status Update
4) The Inexplicably-Public Private Message
5) The Out-Of-Nowhere Oscar Acceptance Speech
6) The Incredibly Obvious Opinion
7) The Step Toward Enlightenment

https://waitbutwhy.c...n-facebook.html


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#59 status - Guest

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Posted 18 November 2019 - 04:27 PM

10 Other Facebook Experiments On Users, Rated On A Highly-Scientific WTF Scale

A former Facebook data scientist who set out to defend the company's emotion-manipulation experiment on nearly 700,000 users decried the hubbub about it, saying that experiments are happening all the time at the company and that every Facebook users has been part of one at some point. Yes, we can all wear t-shirts saying, "I, too, am a Facebook lab rat." Most of the "experiments" are A/B testing that's standard on the Web and rather boring -- such as which color blue you're mostly like to click or how big an ad needs to be for you to notice it -- but some are interesting enough to warrant academic write-ups for shedding new light on human behavior.

Here's other research done by Facebook data scientists on users (possibly on you) that we know about because it's been published. I've given each of these studies a "WTF rating." In my opinion, the hubbub-inducing study in January 2012, which involved curating the emotional content of users' News Feeds to see if Facebook could manipulate their emotions, is the most intrusive, WTF-y of experiments for poking and prodding users emotionally to see what happens, so that's the high end of the scale. These other studies run by Facebook data scientists, sometimes in collaboration with academic researchers, are in reverse chronological order. Facebook data scientists who pop up often as study creators are Adam Kramer, who conducted the emotion study; Cameron Marlow, who founded Facebook's in-house sociology team but has since left the company; and Dean Eckles, an academic cited in Eli Pariser's Filter Bubble for his work on persuasion.

Study 1: Rumor Cascades

What Facebook wanted to find out: How easy is it for lies to spread?

When it happened: July and August 2013
Today In: Tech

Study 2: Calling All Facebook Friends: Exploring requests for help on Facebook

What Facebook wanted to find out: Who asks for something on Facebook?

When it happened: Two weeks in July and August 2012

How many users: 20,000 usersStudy 2: Calling All Facebook Friends: Exploring requests for help on Facebook

What Facebook wanted to find out: Who asks for something on Facebook?

When it happened: Two weeks in July and August 2012

How many users: 20,000 users

Study 3: Self-censorship on Facebook

What Facebook wanted to find out: How many people hold back from blasting the network with their thoughts on something?

When it happened: 17 days in July 2012

How many users: 3.9 million usersStudy 3: Self-censorship on Facebook

What Facebook wanted to find out: How many people hold back from blasting the network with their thoughts on something?

When it happened: 17 days in July 2012

How many users: 3.9 million users

Study 4: Selection Effects in Online Sharing: Consequences for Peer Adoption

What Facebook wanted to find out: Does broadcasting that you plan to buy something make your friends jump on the same opportunity?

When it happened: Two month period in 2012

How many users: 1.2 million users

What Facebook wanted to find out: Do ads work better on you when your friends' names appear next to them, endorsing them?

When it happened: 2011

How many users: 29 million usersWhat Facebook wanted to find out: Do ads work better on you when your friends' names appear next to them, endorsing them?

When it happened: 2011

How many users: 29 million users

Study 6: Inferring Tie Strength from Online Directed Behavior

What Facebook wanted to find out: Which of your Facebook friends are true IRL friends?

When it happened: 2010/2011

How many users: 789 users

What Facebook wanted to find out: How does information spread on Facebook?

When it happened: Seven weeks in August/October 2010

How many users: 253 million users (At the time, this was half of all Facebook users)

Study 8: A 61-million-person experiment in social influence and political mobilization

What Facebook wanted to find out: Can it encourage people to vote?

When it happened: 2010 midterm elections in the U.S.

How many users: 61,279,316 users over the age of 18

Study 9: The Spread of Emotion Via Facebook

What Facebook wanted to find out: Does your emotional state affect your friends?

When it happened: Some three-day period prior to 2012 (when the paper was published)

How many users: 151 million users

Study 10: Feed Me: Motivating Newcomer Contribution in Social Network Sites

What Facebook wanted to find out: How do we get newcomers to Facebook to stick around?

When it happened: 15 weeks starting in March 2008

How many users: 140,292 newcomers

https://www.forbes.c...ments-on-users/


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