Jump to content


Replying to Rhetorical Devices Used in Literary Logic


Post Options

  or Cancel


Topic Summary

Forster Woods

Posted 24 June 2017 - 07:51 PM

I used to have lots of books. Hardback, paperback, magazines, all shelved and organized accordingly. Over the years I've cut back on the types of books that I actually purchase. I'll just get anything new by a popular author at the library and buy older books in subjects that interest me. Digital libraries are cool but there's really something to be said for owning an expensive book that you'll actually use.   
 
Reference books are always a good category to keep in any private library. 
 
Right now I'm looking to invest in a few extended rhetorical reference books. They'll be nice additions to the standard dictionaries and quotation tomes I have in the corner. Too bad the encyclopedias are gathering dust. I haven't really used those in years. It might be a good idea to put them in storage or donate them. 
 
What are some good reference books that are worth purchasing?

Red

Posted 24 June 2017 - 01:00 PM

Parallelism 
 
Metered words and phrases blowing in and out like a misty wind. All filled with a repetitive and smooth flow of balance as they construct components of meaning that are structurally the same.
 
Parallelism is taken from the concept of parallel lines in geometry. It uses equivalent grammatical forms that matches the structure with corresponding words. It takes ideas and expresses them with equal weight and balance, it adds a rhythmic sense to deliver a clear meaning, and it adds style to phrasing in speech and in the written word.
 
These characterizations serve to emphasize any meaning the sentence delivers. Balanced structures can be words, phrases, clauses, or sentences. When used deliberately and with rhythmic repetition it reinforces the impact of any message conveyed. Longer passages can create a dramatic unity through controlled repetition of all the word forms.
 
To avoid faulty parallelism use the same grammatical word forms and phrasing.
 
Parallelism with words is simple enough:
 
Example:  A recommended exercise regimen could include running, swimming, and cycling.
 
(the -ing words are parallel and equal in importance)
 
Try phrasing it:
 
Example: Exercise helps a body to maintain a healthy standard and to help alleviate mental stress.
 
(the phrases beginning with to are parallel and equal in importance)
 
Try it again using clauses:
 
Example: People exercise because they want to be healthy, because it helps the stamina, or because they want to live longer.
 
(the because clauses are parallel and equal)
 
Practice makes perfect!
 
giphy.gif
 
:chuckle:
 
 
 
 
 

Red

Posted 22 June 2017 - 01:52 PM

Here's some more devices that offer rhythm and melodic meter to text and speech:
 
Epizeuxis or diacope
 
These are words or phrases that are repeated in a rapid succession within the same sentence to emphasize a point or idea. 
 
The purpose of epizeuxis is to create greater emotion to the listener or reader. Jabbing the air with emphasis, it motivates and inspires a memorable focus on thoughts and ideas through deep sentiment. 
 
giphy.gif
 
Because of its repetive nature it also inspires memorization of ideas on a sub-conscious level. These devices are used as artistic effects in lyrics, prose and poetry. How many songs have you heard that use these techniques? Have you ever considered the ideas presented in the lyrics of your favorite songs? 
 
There are two other terms that use the same technique. 
 
One is an Epistrophe. 
 
These are repetitive words or phrases at the end of sentences that call attention to a point of interest. 
 
CxNPzvY.jpg
 
The opposite of this effect brings us to the second term. 
 
Anaphora - basically the same definition as Epistrophe except they come at the beginning of sentences. 
 
anaphora.jpg
 
:Flying:

Red

Posted 22 June 2017 - 01:33 PM

 

Irony is a literary technique & rhetoric device that has been used for many years in speech, art and everyday life. Although irony has been used for a long time, there hasn’t been an exact definition of irony. There have been hundreds of definitions suggested over the years, however, a general consensus is that:
 
Irony is a figure of speech which is a contradiction or incongruity between what is expected and what actually occurs.
 
Most of the definitions of irony are something along these lines, though there is often disagreement about the specific meaning of this term.
 
 
:Grin8:

 

 

:Grin_Jump3:

 

You cheated.

 

That's pasta.

 

:chuckle:


Posted 21 June 2017 - 04:22 PM

 

How can I make a thread of this nature without including metaphors?
 
:chuckle: 
 
Metaphors are one of the most common types of speech. They add a sort of definition and color because they describe a comparison between two things that are most often apart except for a common characteristic that can link the two together. A noun or a verb can be described as something different. 
 
An example comparing a chef to a writer. Learning to write can be visualized with cooking skills. One must learn to bake, roast, chop, and cut. Including all the little things that go with it through practice and experience. They're great for sharpening the imagination and to give further understanding in communicating ideas 
 
Metaphors are different from similes in that they don't use terms like "like" or "as" to compare two things. Metaphors make hidden comparisons. Portraying one thing as being something else but not that something else. There is an implied implicit meaning.
 
animals-fox-chicken_farm-poultry_farms-i
 
:chuckle:

 

 

Irony is a literary technique & rhetoric device that has been used for many years in speech, art and everyday life. Although irony has been used for a long time, there hasn’t been an exact definition of irony. There have been hundreds of definitions suggested over the years, however, a general consensus is that:
 
Irony is a figure of speech which is a contradiction or incongruity between what is expected and what actually occurs.
 
Most of the definitions of irony are something along these lines, though there is often disagreement about the specific meaning of this term.
 
 
:Grin8:

Posted 21 June 2017 - 01:25 PM

 

Colloquialisms are cool. 
 
Who better at them than old Mark Twain. 
 
:cool:
 
Colloquialisms are words, phrases, and slang terms which characters in a group or society use to talk in real life. Sometimes they can be offensive. Perhaps that's why Huck Finn has been on a ban list in some town or another since it was first published.
 
Huck Finn’s Censorship History
 

 

 

 

I like those above Twainisms. Maybe they should be a legitimate category in rhetoric.

 

:funny-chicken-dancing:

 

That's one of my favorite styles of colloquialism - The Vernacular. Twain was a master at it. Finding the common, everyday voice when reading a book. Leaving out the academic high brow way of speaking when reading the written word. Readers like to hear the voices in the story. Informal voices with correct grammar are often most appealing to a reader.  

 


Red

Posted 20 June 2017 - 01:27 PM

Do you like to Internet?
 
Are you worth your weight in Good?
 
How would you like a bag of Happy?
 
Did the words internet, good, and happy seem a bit out of place to you?
 
Converting words and forcing them into unexpected grammatical styles is known as anthimeria. It involves changing adjectives into nouns, nouns into verbs, and adjectives into adverbs. It is a common practice in advertising. Simply put: It's a conversion of expression by changing one word class to another. The goal is to produce a striking effect by jumping from one meaning to another. Tickling the brain with an image or insight. Not to be confused with nominalization. Which is turning verbs into nouns.
 
tumblr_ln0vg8CJ3Y1qlaajjo1_500.jpg

RottenApples

Posted 20 June 2017 - 12:16 PM

 

Today, I'll start off with the ad hominem attack. This one is used constantly. It's a favorite technique because it causes lots of discord among the arguers. It's so much easier to question an individuals personal associations rather than paying attention to the validity of the main argument. Ad hominems can be mistaken as a personal insult when the subtle nature is a different distinction. Blatant and clever insults against somebody make it hard for people to believe it isn't true. If you look at this rationally such techniques never provide a valid reason to disregard decent criticism. 
 
Ad hominem has great power to persuade as it leaves a large impression on the mind of the audience. It somehow causes bias from the audience. This is a flawed arguing technique as it causes judgments to made without evaluation of facts on logical grounds.
 

 

 

Look!
 
More Insults...
 
:Hammer:
 
Dysphemism is a common rhetorical device used everywhere in the media. 
 
It is used to kill reputations and insult the character. 
 
Basically, it is the use of offensive language as opposed to an inoffensive one. 
 
Taking the positive and turning it into a negative is the goal. 
 
It can be non verbal as well. 
 
67b07bf7a171e83bf755e424778ec78b.jpg
 
The purpose of dysphemism is to insult a group and create more social distance. 
 
Flaring up the emotions to action. 
 
Motivations to use this form of speech are to incite fear and anger.
 
Prevalent in politics and hate speech.
 
They are opposite to Euphemisms. 
 
Which are positive expressions in place of negative ones.
 
euphemism%2Bbb.jpg
 
:chuckle:

Posted 20 June 2017 - 11:43 AM

orwell+man.jpg


Red

Posted 18 June 2017 - 04:58 PM

Alliteration is a great technique to add style in speech. It occurs when words are strung together using the same consonant sound close together. They can be can quite fancy and interesting because it requires more emphasis on the sounds produced. They add a musical and poetic essence to phrasing and they're rhythmic in nature. Making them easy to learn because it creates a flow in the sentence structure. 
 
Alliteration is used extensively in the marketing industry because they make the brand names pop with clarity and are easy to remember. It's best to use them sparely as they tend to get monotonous. Stringing 2 words together in this way can strengthen an idea for some short sharp shocks.
 
When it's really well done they really add some kick....
 
:happy:
 
 
 
 
 

Review the complete topic (launches new window)

IPB Skin By Virteq